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Everything you need as you prepare to vote — study our interactive guides, ask questions, print your sample ballot and more.

Mayor’s Race Results: Karen Bass Declared Winner Over Rick Caruso

Rick Caruso, a slightly tan man, on the left; Karen Bass, a woman with brown skin in a red suit, on the right.
Los Angeles mayoral candidates Rick Caruso and Karen Bass, as seen on Election Night, Nov. 8, 2022.
(Brian Feinzimer
/
for LAist)

Live Results

Karen Bass will be the first woman to lead the city of Los Angeles as mayor.

Bass, a member of Congress, defeated businessman Rick Caruso. The Associated Press called the race Wednesday after new numbers released by the L.A. County Registrar showed her leading by more than 46,000 votes, or 53% of the ballots counted so far.

Throughout their campaigns, Bass and Caruso presented very different visions for the City of Los Angeles. They differ on how to deal with many of the city's most pressing issues, which include a housing shortage, a rising unhoused population and residents divided on next steps for law enforcement.

The contest was a virtual dead heat on Election Night. Caruso pulled slightly ahead last Thursday, but since then Bass gained a steady lead.

It's also worth noting that L.A. is on track to have the most voters in history cast ballots in a mayoral election.

You can read more about the job expected of whoever ultimately becomes L.A.'s next mayor here.

Here's L.A. County's schedule for the release of new vote totals
  • Estimated time of the following releases is between 4- 5 p.m.

  • Tue, Nov. 22 | Fri, Nov. 25 | Tue, Nov. 29 |Fri, Dec. 2

  • And if needed, Monday, Dec. 5

  • The vote count as of Nov. 18:

    • 2,441,323 ballots have been processed and counted
    • 80% of those were mail-in ballots
    • 20% voted in person
  • Still to be counted:

    • Vote by Mail ballots: 22,200
    • Conditional Voter Registration ballots: 3,000
    • Provisional ballots: 50

About The Candidates

Karen Bass

Rep. Karen Bass is in her 6th term representing the 37th Congressional District, which includes the Venice/Fairfax area of Los Angeles. Before coming to the House, Bass served in the California State Assembly. In 2008, she became the first African American woman in U.S. history to serve as Speaker of any state legislature.

Rick Caruso

Rick Caruso is best known for developing real estate projects like The Grove and The Americana. In addition, he has served as the president of the L.A. Police Commission. Most recently, he was the chair of the USC Board of Trustees. He outspent Bass by very wide margins, largely using his own money (see below).

Follow The Money

A Note On The Results

  • Keep in mind that in tight races particularly, the winner may not be determined for days or weeks after Election Day. In L.A. County, the first batch of results released includes vote by mail ballots received before Election Day, followed by early votes cast at vote centers before Election Day, then votes cast in-person on Election Day. This process is expected to wrap up in the early hours of Nov. 9. Then, additional results will be released following a schedule you can see on the county's site. In California, ballots postmarked on or before Nov. 8 are counted toward the results as long as they arrive within seven days of the election. Results must be certified by county election officials by Dec. 8.

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Tracking your ballot

You can track the status of your ballot:

If your mail-in ballot is rejected for any reason (like a missing or mismatched signature), your county registrar must contact you to give you a chance to fix it. In Los Angeles County, the registrar will send you a notification by mail and you have until Nov. 28 to reply and "cure" your ballot.

How We're Covering This Election

  • Early voters and mail-in ballots have fundamentally reshaped how votes are counted and when election results are known.

  • Our priority will be sharing outcomes and election calls only when they have been thoroughly checked and vetted. To that end, we will rely on NPR and The Associated Press for race calls. We will not report the calls or projections of other news outlets. You can find more on NPR and The AP's process for counting votes and calling races here, here and here.

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