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LACCD Measure LA Results: What We Know So Far About The Community College Bond

Live Results

Measure LA would allow the L.A. Community College District to issue a $5.3 Billion bond, financed by a new property tax, to improve infrastructure and job training facilities across LACCD’s nine colleges.

Measure LA needs a 55% approval rate from voters to pass this November.

To finance the bond, homeowners would be taxed up to $25 per $100,000 of their assessed property valuation. For most homeowners, that tax is estimated to range between $88-$157, generating $345,000,000 each year until the bond is fulfilled. After that, the tax would expire.

Here's L.A. County's schedule for the release of new vote totals
  • Estimated time of the following releases is between 4- 5 p.m.

  • Tue, Nov. 22 | Fri, Nov. 25 | Tue, Nov. 29 |Fri, Dec. 2

  • And if needed, Monday, Dec. 5

  • The vote count as of Nov. 18:

    • 2,441,323 ballots have been processed and counted
    • 80% of those were mail-in ballots
    • 20% voted in person
  • Still to be counted:

    • Vote by Mail ballots: 22,200
    • Conditional Voter Registration ballots: 3,000
    • Provisional ballots: 50
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Understanding The Measure

A bond is a common way to raise money for big expenditures in local infrastructure. LACCD previously took out construction bonds in 2001, 2003, 2008, and 2016.

Some context on LACCD: With nine colleges and about 229,000 students, it’s the largest community college district in the country. It’s a blue-collar educational engine for the region. More than half of LACCD students earn an income at or below the poverty line. More than three-fourths of its students are people of color. More than two-thirds of LACCD students are enrolled part time; many of them juggle work and home responsibilities.

The bond will allow LACCD to address “urgent and basic repairs such as removing asbestos and lead paint, upgrading gas and sewer lines, fixing leaky roofs, and improving earthquake safety to make our local colleges clean and safe for learning,” according to the ballot measure.

The measure states that the funds cannot be put towards LACCD employee salaries or pensions. There will be yearly audits of spending on the proposed projects and an independent Citizens’ Oversight Committee.

Those against the measure cite poor management of the $3.3 billion dollar bond issued by LACCD in 2016. At the time, the L.A. Times reported lawsuits, political infighting, and missed performance targets.

Want more: Read our full voter guide

Did LAist help you vote?
If you used LAist reporting to vote during this midterm election, please make a donation to keep reliable and independent local news strong and available for all. Thank you for investing in your neighborhood.

A Note On The Results

  • Keep in mind that in tight races particularly, the winner may not be determined for days or weeks after Election Day. In L.A. County, the first batch of results released includes vote by mail ballots received before Election Day, followed by early votes cast at vote centers before Election Day, then votes cast in-person on Election Day. This process is expected to wrap up in the early hours of Nov. 9. Then, additional results will be released following a schedule you can see on the county's site. In California, ballots postmarked on or before Nov. 8 are counted toward the results as long as they arrive within seven days of the election. Results must be certified by county election officials by Dec. 8.

Tracking Your Ballot

You can track the status of your ballot:

If your mail-in ballot is rejected for any reason (like a missing or mismatched signature), your county registrar must contact you to give you a chance to fix it. In Los Angeles County, the registrar will send you a notification by mail and you have until Nov. 28 to reply and "cure" your ballot.

How We're Covering This Election

  • Early voters and mail-in ballots have fundamentally reshaped how votes are counted and when election results are known.

  • Our priority will be sharing outcomes and election calls only when they have been thoroughly checked and vetted. To that end, we will rely on NPR and The Associated Press for race calls. We will not report the calls or projections of other news outlets. You can find more on NPR and The AP's process for counting votes and calling races here, here and here.

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