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Morning Brief: LAUSD Parents Weigh In, California Gun Laws And Saving The Queen Mary

 First graders at Brainard Elementary demonstrate the very lengthy process of lining up, socially distanced, outside.
First graders at Brainard Elementary demonstrate the very lengthy process of lining up, socially distanced, outside.
(Kyle Stokes
/
LAist)
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Good morning, L.A. It’s June 8.

One of our defining moments in turning the tide of the pandemic has been reopening Los Angeles Unified School District campuses for in-person learning.

But not everyone is excited to see students return to the classroom — particularly Black parents, according to a new LAUSD survey.

That parent group was the most likely to report their students had a better academic experience during distance learning — and the least likely to want to send their kids back to in-person classes.

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It wasn’t only because of health factors. Surveyed parents said they’re concerned about racism, bullying and low academic standards for students in their school.

The survey also shows a dichotomy of equity perceived by parents, as LAist education reporter Kyle Stokes wrote:

In the LAUSD parent poll, 34% of Black respondents say their children received more teacher support since distance learning started; only 12% of Black parents say their children received less support… White parents reported almost the exact opposite: one-third of white parents said their students’ received less support.

Keep reading for more on what’s happening in L.A., and stay safe out there.

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What Else You Need To Know Today

Before You Go... An Angeleno Reflects On How To 'Live In Harmony' With Different Identities

Lionel Mares, standing, with his mother, Maria Angelica Mares, and the children of family friends at his graduation from Cal State Northridge. His mother passed away in 2020.
Lionel Mares, standing, with his mother, Maria Angelica Mares, and the children of family friends. His mother passed away in 2020.
(Courtesy of Lionel Mares)

As a punk-loving, Vans-wearing Mexican American kid, Lionel Mares was called “white-wash” by peers at his Valley high school. Then, in college, some non-Latinos seemed “surprised to see and hear someone who is Hispanic speak in an articulate manner.”

He wrote about how he stopped listening to both, and forged his own path.

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