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Silver Lake's Forage Announces Return of Foraging

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Photo by nicadlr via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr


Photo by nicadlr via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr
Silver Lake's Forage is a restaurant based on the eating experience of preparing food brought in from customers as grown in the area. But in mid-April, Forage found themselves having to put on hold their program of accepting homegrown foods for preparation because of the uncertainty of the practice's legality.Today chef/owner Jason Kim announced the return of their foraging program, with some revisions that they hope will elevate the movement of homegrown food and urban farming, much like the Food & Flowers Freedom Act did when it was approved by City Council last month.

Forage will now accept produce from homegrowers, so long as the grower becomes certified. This might seem like a daunting task, however Forage has "spent time with farmers, growers, chefs, regulators, lawyers, and health advocates to figure out what food source approval actually entails," they explain, and can now pass on to their would-be home-based suppliers what this involves.

And they've got five people serving as an advisory board who will help inform the public about the process of becoming certified and will regularly update the Forage website with their narratives and information. Thanks to a private donor, Forage can support five more such growers, and are seeking applications for the slots. In the meantime, you can pursue certification, bring 'em your produce, and get a dish on the menu.

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Of course, you can go in there empty-handed (well, bring your wallet!) and order up a meal made with fresh, locally-sourced ingredients, and satisfy your hunger and help support urban agriculture, too.