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The Most Decadent, Deep-Fried PB&J Is Served Inside This Koreatown Bar

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Mmm, just look at that baby. (Photo by John Pascha, courtesy of Lock & Key)
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The next time you have a hankering for a seriously decadent, deep-fried PB&J, you don't have to scour dessert shops across L.A. for the sweet treat. Instead, you can get your hands on one inside of a Koreatown bar.

Lock & Key's PB&J is a special beast of its own, and it has to do with the house-made waffle batter that's used to coat the soft and fluffy brioche bread before it gets deep-fried. The result is an extremely light, crispy and crumbly outer layer. That part's topped with crème anglaise and powdered sugar. Then as you bite into the sandwich, you're met with a nice helping of a warm and creamy peanut butter and jelly mixture. It's a perfect amalgamation of textures, and sweet and savory flavors.

The fresh ingredients also make a difference in this dessert. The folks behind Lock & Key get their brioche from the Röckenwagner stand at the local farmers market, and they make the peanut butter in-house. Soon, they plan on making their own jelly as well.

If you've tried the bar's PB&J in the past, you'll find that this one is a different and updated rendition. We had sampled the older version months ago, but when we were invited by Lock & Key recently to try out the bar's new menu items helmed by new chef Jose Reyes, we noticed a big difference.

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The reason behind changing the PB&J recipe was that Lock & Key owner Cyrus Batchan wanted to make the dish a little more savory. Batchan tells LAist that in the past they used Hawaiian bread, but later found that brioche held all the flavors together a lot better.

And while you're there, you might as well throw back one or two of the bar's many amazing craft cocktails. One of our new favorites is the Zelda, a refreshing springtime libation made with vermouth, rosé, elderflower liqueur and Castillian bitter. This one may go down lightly, but it sure packs a punch, so go slow with this one.

Lock & Key is located at 239 S. Vermont Ave., Koreatown, (213) 389-5625