Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

This is an archival story that predates current editorial management.

This archival content was written, edited, and published prior to LAist's acquisition by its current owner, Southern California Public Radio ("SCPR"). Content, such as language choice and subject matter, in archival articles therefore may not align with SCPR's current editorial standards. To learn more about those standards and why we make this distinction, please click here.

Arts and Entertainment

Bike On, LA: Hot Spots to Check Out During CicLAvia

5b2c49ab4488b30009279aa9-original.jpg
The 4th Street Bridge between the Arts District and Boyle Heights
Before you read more...
Dear reader, we're asking you to help us keep local news available for all. Your tax-deductible financial support keeps our stories free to read, instead of hidden behind paywalls. We believe when reliable local reporting is widely available, the entire community benefits. Thank you for investing in your neighborhood.

If you've ever wondered what a car-free Los Angeles might look like, you could soon get your answer. Sunday, April 10, 2011 marks the second annual CicLAvia, an event during which streets are blocked off to cars so that bikes, runners, walkers and all others (except...well...drivers) can get out and enjoy the sunshine safely.

While you're en route, Huffington Post has a list of historic buildings to look out for, including the 4th Street Bridge, the Japanese American National Museum and El Dorado, the former Stowell Hotel.

The name CicLAvia is a spinoff on the word ciclovía, which in Spanish literally means "bike path," but is used to describe a tradition that originated in Botoga, Colombia in the 1970s. Faced with congestion and traffic problems, the South American city adopted the idea of regularly closing down streets to traffic, according to StreetsWiki. The idea took off in the 1980s, and now, the city holds ciclovía every Sunday and holiday, between 7:00 am and 2:00 pm.

Last year's event in Los Angeles closed down 7.5 miles of streets, and this year's event will follow the same route between Hollenbeck Park and the intersection of Melrose and Vermont, according to CicLAvia's website.