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Some Albertsons Stores to Go 'Zero Waste'

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Photo by CMG0220 via Flickr
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National grocery retailer Supervalu, whose Albertsons brand stores are one of our regional grocery options, recently announced they will enact a "zero waste" model at 40 of their stores. The eco-friendly move will begin with primarily focusing on Albertsons stores, says TreeHugger.

Two of Albertsons' SoCal stores, both located in Santa Barbara, have already achieved zero waste status.

What does it mean to be "zero waste," though? Market Watch explains:

To achieve this recognition, stores must divert at least 90% of all waste from landfills -- a feat accomplished in part through increased associate engagement, recycling, composting and the company's Fresh Rescue food bank donation program, to which SUPERVALU contributed more than 60 million pounds of food last year.
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Supervalu's "Fresh Rescue" program takes safe food off the shelves of the meat, dairy, and produce section that may have reached their "sell-by" date but remain edible, and get them to local food banks.

The two Santa Barbara Albertsons stores have actually achieved 95% diversion of waste, exceeding the parent company's benchmark.

Waste by major grocery retailers has become an issue of concern lately. Recently a Los Angeles-based filmmaker, who engages in dumpster diving to provide for his family, launched a campaign to urge Monrovia-based Trader Joe's to adopt more strict food waste policies.