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Phallus Class at Oxy College?

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Los Angeles accounted for 25% of the Young America's Foundation's "Dirty Dozen" list, as showcased in the "Current" section buried in Sunday's Times.

The YAF site is a joke -- but apparently this feature, published since the '60s, is not. "America’s Most Bizarre and Politically Correct College Courses" (and I'm sure they missed the REAL good ones). Eagle Rock's Occidental College takes two of the top five:

1. Occidental College's The Phallus covers a broad study on the relation "between the phallus and the penis, the meaning of the phallus, phallologocentrism, the lesbian phallus, the Jewish phallus, the Latino phallus, and the relation of the phallus and fetishism."

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2. Queer Musicology at the University of California-Los Angeles explores how "sexual difference and complex gender identities in music and among musicians have incited productive consternation" during the 1990s. Music under consideration includes works by Schubert and Holly Near, Britten and Cole Porter, and Pussy Tourette.

3. Amherst College in Massachusetts offers Taking Marx Seriously: "Should Marx be given another chance?" Students in this class are asked to question if Marxism still has "credibility," while also inquiring if societies can gain new insights by "returning to [Marx's] texts." Coming to Marx's rescue, this course also states that Lenin, Stalin, and Pol Pot misapplied the concepts of Marxism.

4. Students enrolled in the University of Pennsylvania's Adultery Novel read a series of 19th and 20th century works about "adultery" and watch "several adultery films." Students apply "various critical approaches in order to place adultery into its aesthetic, social and cultural context, including: sociological descriptions of modernity, Marxist examinations of family as a social and economic institution" and "feminist work on the construction of gender."

5. Occidental College--making the list twice for the second year in a row--offers Blackness, which elaborates on a "new blackness," "critical blackness," "post-blackness," and an "unforgivable blackness," which all combine to create a "feminist New Black Man."

6. Border Crossings, Borderlands: Transnational Feminist Perspectives on Immigration is University of Washington's way of exploring the immigration debate. The class allegedly unearths what is "highlighted and concealed in contemporary public debates about U.S. immigration" policy.

7. Whiteness: The Other Side of Racism is Mount Holyoke College's attempt to analyze race. The class seeks to spark thought on: "What is whiteness?" "How is it related to racism?" "What are the legal frameworks of whiteness?" "How is whiteness enacted in everyday practice?" And how does whiteness impact the "lives of whites and people of color?

8. Native American Feminisms at the University of Michigan looks at the development of "Native feminist thought" and its "relationship both to Native land-based struggles and non-Native feminist movements."

9. Johns Hopkins University offers Mail Order Brides: Understanding the Philippines in Southeast Asian Context, which is a supposedly deep look into Filipino kinship and gender.

10. Cornell University's Cyberfeminism investigates "the emergence of cyberfeminism in theory and art in the context of feminism/post feminism and the accelerated technological developments of the last thirty years of the twentieth century."

11. Duke University's American Dreams/American Realities course seeks to unearth "such myths as 'rags to riches,' 'beacon to the world,' and the 'frontier,' in defining the American character."

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12. Swarthmore College's Nonviolent Responses to Terrorism "deconstruct[s] terrorism" and "build[s] on promising nonviolent procedures to combat today's terrorism." The "non-violent" struggle Blacks pursued in the 1960s is outlined as a mode for tackling today's terrorism.