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Orange County by the Numbers: Not so Republican Anymore

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"Reason #2,187 to Love Orange County: Because in Orange County--where nice abs are a spiritual quest--someone would actually drive a car like this." | Photo by C-Monster via LAist Featured Photos on Flickr


"Reason #2,187 to Love Orange County: Because in Orange County--where nice abs are a spiritual quest--someone would actually drive a car like this." | Photo by C-Monster via LAist Featured Photos on Flickr
Orange County is 34 cities and 789 square miles big and has, for a long time, been a symbol for Republicanism. That may not be the case anymore, finds the New York Times. At the very least, the demographics have shifted dramatically since those "Nixon County" days. Here's a quick look some recent statistics:

Population: 3.1 million
Registered Republican Voters: 43%
Registered Independent Voters: 20%
Homes that Speak a Language Other than English: 49%
White Population: 45%
Foreign Born Residents: 30%
Does Not Have Health Insurance: 25%
Voted for Obama: 48%

But just because there's been an influx of Hispanics, Vietnamese, Korean and Chinese residents, it doesn't mean the county is largely Republican. As the Times notes, "an influx of immigrants certainly does not equate to automatic Democratic gains, here or anywhere else across the country."

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(h/t: @torrmoz)