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News

Should L.A. Up the Amount of Dogs & Cats You Can Own from 3 to 5?

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Photo by fotonomous via LAist Featured Photos on Flickr


Photo by fotonomous via LAist Featured Photos on Flickr
As Los Angeles law stands today, you can only own and register up to three cats and/or dogs. More than that would require a resident to qualify for a kennel permit. Now a motion to increase that number to five is gaining traction on both sides of the issue, finds the Daily News. Supporters of the issue, including two councilmembers and the head of the Department of Animal Services, say it could increase city revenues via licensing fees -- up to $800,000 -- and it will help relieve overcrowding at animal shelters. Since the recession began, causing economic hardship and foreclosures, the rate of impounds at city shelters has grown by 20%.

There's been a heavy amount of opposition as well. "There are serious issues of increased dog barking and other animal noises, fleas, parasites and rodents, sanitation, odor and animals escaping yards and causing dangers/nuisance to tenants," wrote James Clarke, executive director of the Apartment Association of Greater Los Angeles.

Phyllis Daughherty, director of the Animal Issues Movement in Los Angeles, said "L.A. will be known as the Barking City. There will be howling in the streets - by dogs. (And) everyone will be howling at this to City Hall."

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Also, opponents say that since the motion by Bill Rosendahl and Paul Koretz, requests for an increase in pet ownership per resident and not household, homes with with multiple dwellers could explode with pets.

Town hall meetings about the motion will be held at 6:30 p.m. tonight at the East Valley Animal Shelter and next Wednesday on the Westside.