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LAist Staff Interview: Meet Carolyn

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Carolyn Kellogg has been the editor of LAist for just about a month. She's been writing for the site for much longer than that. At the same time, she hosts Pinky's Paperhaus but we'll get into that later. She explains her professional past as a "former music journalist turned web producer". We'd describe her as energetic, intelligent, invested, excited and colorful.

And that's just her hair (rimshot). Thank you, please tip your wait staff.

We wanted to know more about our fearless leader and figured you did as well. Here's her LA Story.

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(photo credit: Jennifer Kolmel)

Age and Occupation:
I've decided this age question is inappropriate—we should scratch it from all future interviews, don't you think? Occupation: Editor of LAist.

Home Town:
Born in Tallahassee, grew up in Rhode Island, Virginia and New Hampshire.

Current LA Neighborhood:
A smart real estate agent would call it Silverlake-adjacent, but it's Koreatown.

How long have you lived in Los Angeles and where?
About 17 years. In addition to Koreatown, I've lived in Highland Park, Silverlake, South Pasadena and central LA near USC. And Palms for 6 awful months.

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How'd you end up writing for LAist?
LAist linked to my blog Pinky's Paperhaus and the post right below that one said the site was looking for contributors. Not taking any chances, I sent LAist HQ a case of Veuve Cliquot, a new Tivo, a gift certificate to AOC and two "massage therapists." The rest is history.

What is the best thing about editing LAist?
There are a million stories in the naked city, and I get to try to write some of them, and help the LAist contributors write them too. I get to spend time exploring the city and call it work. There's so much going on here—it's an embarrassment of riches. Imagine being editor of Texarkanaist – that would suck.

The hardest?
It's hard to walk away from the computer. What if somebody drives into a Metrolink train while I'm in the shower? Suddenly I realize it's 4pm and I'm still in my pajamas.