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Food

Crabby Thanksgiving

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LAist did a double-take while scanning the seafood counter at Whole Foods on Fairfax last night. Crab was in season and the store signs offered the treat at $5.99 a pound, which is pretty good considering how overpriced items are in that store. That means it's CRAB SEASON!

This 11/20/2004 Daily News article "Hectic crab season is depressing early prices" confirms the obvious:

The season-opening fishing frenzy for the much-desired delicacy causes a glut of fresh crabs during the first few weeks -- depressing prices for fishermen, creating dangerous conditions on the open seas and leading to higher consumer prices later in the season when fresh crabs are in short supply.
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That means that crab may be even cheaper at stores all over town this weekend. Ralphs circulars are advertising the tasty critters for $3.99 a pound. A foodie friend whispers that there's a primo cheaper source in Chinatown, but refuses to disclose the store's location until Sunday.

What would a (non-observant) Californian Thanksgiving be without crab on the table? Now gluttons can afford to be extra greedy until crab prices stabilise and Northern California fishermen can earn back their investment.