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Arts and Entertainment

Soundcheck: The Airborne Toxic Event, The Deadly Syndrome & The Henry Clay People @ Spaceland, 6/17/08

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Part of an ongoing series.

Last month, local band The Airborne Toxic Event (MySpace) returned to Spaceland (MySpace) in Silver Lake to headline a show that included The Deadly Syndrome (MySpace), and The Henry Clay People (MySpace) with support from I Make This Sound (MySpace) and Le Switch (MySpace). As aptly described by Mouse from Classical Geek Theatre, "Before a mixed-crowd of longtime fans and recent, true-believing converts, The Airborne Toxic Event rewarded ticket holders with a near flawless-set that could have just as easily been played at The Hollywood Bowl, The Kodak Theatre, or Coachella. There was no melodrama, very little hype, and nobody on stage had to prove anything. It was just the band and their songs; naked, raw, hard-boiled."

Without question, The Airborne Toxic Event and its frontman Mikel Jollett are ambassadors to the rising stars of the Los Angeles indie music scene (especially in the Echo Park, Silver Lake, and Eagle Rock communities). Not only is "Missy" their anthemic tribute to the city, but they effortlessly profess their love and respect for their comrades, whether it's via shout-outs (e.g. The Monolators, Rademacher) from onstage, or when handing out free Indie 103.1 compilation CDs to their fans and recommending tracks (e.g. The Movies, The Henry Clay People). It's a sentiment echoed by Mouse, as "They have done nothing but try to create awareness for how special Los Angeles music is right now, and at some point we're all going to have to suck-it-up, accept the separation anxiety, and let them go."

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Speaking of separation, this show was bittersweet for the band, as it was a return to what they've fondly referred as their "second home" (it was the location of their now-legendary January residency). According to them, "...there were 450 people through the door in the sold out show. Thank you for all of your kind words. It really meant a lot to us to play one last time at Spaceland."

More after the jump.

As for upcoming shows, The Airborne Toxic Event's is on August 5th -- the day their debut album streets -- on KCRW's Morning Becomes Eclectic and August 7th at the El Rey Theatre (MySpace) with Radars To The Sky (MySpace). Meanwhile, The Deadly Syndrome's only upcoming show is this Thursday at the Hammer Museum in Westwood as part of their month-long Also I Like To Rock series, as they will reportedly be returning to the studio to record new material. And The Henry Clay People's upcoming shows are on July 17th at The Echo, August 9th at Detroit Bar (MySpace) in Costa Mesa, and August 24th at the Sunset Junction Street Festival (MySpace).

Meanwhile, Jollett will be part of a special show tonight at Bordello (MySpace), co-presented by Web In Front and the aforementioned Classical Geek Theatre. As described by Mouse, "Top talent from LA local bands will be playing solo acoustic sets of songs you don't hear too often... we have Mikel Jollett (The Airborne Toxic Event), Andrew Spitser (Radars to the Sky), Tim James (The Movies), Sarah Negahdari (The Happy Hollows), and Evan Way (The Parson Redheads). Two of these singers will also be singing with each other's sets. Another one is bringing along a member of their band and another is actually playing an acoustic set with their whole band for at least part of the set. I won't tell you which is which, and there are sure to be other surprises in store. You can probably count on some outstanding covers (just a hunch) and unearthed songs from the musician's band's early days."

Special thanks to The Airborne Toxic Event, The Deadly Syndrome, The Henry Clay People, and Spaceland.