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This archival content was written, edited, and published prior to LAist's acquisition by its current owner, Southern California Public Radio ("SCPR"). Content, such as language choice and subject matter, in archival articles therefore may not align with SCPR's current editorial standards. To learn more about those standards and why we make this distinction, please click here.

News

AM news: in the PV, Yahoo, LAPD

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unhappy trails The Donald is ruffling feathers in Rancho Palos Verdes with a request to rename the street that leads to his new development Trump National Drive. So far, city officials are sticking with the current Ocean Trails Drive.

fake TV Also from Palos Verdes (buzzing with news today, the PV!): a man who claimed to be producing a government-backed TV show about the Department of Homeland Security is expected to plead guilty today to bilking investors of $5.5 million. He may be the first failed TV producer to be taken to court for talking a good game.

tussle goes internet People unhappy with the Pasadena Unified School District have been using a Yahoo Group for discussion. A parent who is happy with the district's work got Yahoo to yank the group, saying its discussions were libelous or defamatory. One of the allegations that first surfaced in the now-defunct dicsussion group — that district Superintendent Percy Clark plagiarized material published in a guest column in Pasadena Weekly — proved to be true.

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still needs oversight The LAPD's federal consent decree has been renewed for another 3 years. That means that the department, which has "made progress," will remain under federal oversight to prevent corruption and abuse. Of the 152 provisions in the initial decree, 30% remain to be met.