Disneyland Prices Just Went Up Again

The galactic entertainment empire has struck again, raising ticket prices at its Disneyland resort (and other parks) yet again. It will now cost more than $100 for an adult ticket on the least busy days at the park. And the deals get worse from there.

Here are the new standard ticket prices for adults (child tickets and other offers can be found here):

One-day value ticket: $104
One-day value park hopper: $154

One-day regular ticket: $129
One-day regular park hopper: $179

One-day peak ticket: $149
One-day peak park hopper: $199

Southern California resident offer:
Three-day, one park per day ticket: $179
Three-day park hopper: $234


RELATED: Disney Wants A Company-Friendly City Council, And They're Spending Big To Make It Happen


Disneyland has been working to address overcrowding at the park for a few years, but it hasn't really worked out, according to an L.A. Times analysis. Average wait times were up at nine of the parks' 10 most popular rides, the paper found.

That overcrowding issue is only going to jump to light speed once the new Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge attraction debuts later this year, possibly in June.

The Walt Disney Company reported more than $59 billion in revenue for the 2018 fiscal year, up 8 percent from 2017. Worldwide, Disney's parks and reports brought in roughly 20.3 billion last fiscal year, 10 percent higher than 2017.

The Disneyland resort's overcrowding issues are only going to jump to lightspeed once the new Star Wars: Galaxy's Edge attraction debuts later this year, possibly in June. (Courtesy Disney Parks via Getty Images)

The price hike also comes after the minimum wage for Disneyland park workers went up to $15 this year. Unions representing theme park and hotel workers say Disneyland and hotels surrounding the park pay poverty wages, forcing some of their workers into homelessness.

That's why they also put Measure L on the November ballot, which passed and will further increase the minimum wage for certain hospitality workers to $18 an hour by 2022. But it's possible the new law won't even apply to Disneyland.

Disney's press office did not respond to a request for comment.


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