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A Very Rainy Sequel: What To Expect This Week From The Storm

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Get ready to get drenched! Although we got a taste of the rain over the weekend (and some thorough car washes), our SoCal rainstorms that have been hydrating our parched earth haven't ended quite yet. Angelenos are now stepping into our second rainpocalypse this week and it'll continue on through Wednesday.

The National Weather Service reported that this second downpour that began this morning (just in time for rush hour traffic!) will peak Tuesday afternoon. It's expected to bring about three inches of rain to downtown and coastal areas, and five inches of rain in the foothills in Los Angeles and Ventura counties over the next two days, according to the L.A. Times.

“It’s just a big ol' storm," NWS senior forecaster Andrew Rorke told the Times. "The entire state is going to be covered with rain today.”

And forecasters are expecting this one to be big—mdash;with the heaviest rainfall since February, reported KTLA. A flash-flood watch is issued for Tuesday morning through late Tuesday night in the areas of Los Angeles and Ventura counties that recently experienced wildfires, especially the Springs, Colby, Powerhouse and Williams fires. Same goes for the Orange, Riverside and San Bernardino areas.

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Mudslides are also a concern for local residents. Even though the weekend rainstorm wasn't too heavy, it still triggered a rock slide in Malibu, where crews have had to close off part of northbound Pacific Coast Highway for days. Residents near the San Gabriel Mountains have been putting up sandbags and barriers in hopes of thwarting any potential mudslides.

“The problem is it’s only two days after we’ve had a pretty good storm,” National Weather Service meteorologist Kathy Hoxsie told the Times. “When you don’t give the soil a chance to dry out, we’re expecting it could be a very notable impact.”