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L.A. County Sheriff's Deputy Found Guilty Of Assaulting Inmates

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LA County Sheriff's Department (Photo by KingoftheHill. via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr)
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A jury found an L.A. County Sheriff’s deputy accused of violently beating multiple inmates over several years, guilty of three misdemeanor assault charges on Friday. At the same time, the deputy was acquitted multiple more serious felony charges for which he was being tried.

Jermaine Jackson was accused by L.A. County prosecutors of savagely beating inmates at a County Sheriff’s Dept. lockup in Compton, as well as the infamous Men’s Central Jail in downtown Los Angeles, according to the L.A. Times.

While the FBI was investigating the Sheriff’s department for reported abuse in several of its facilities at the same time as Jackson’s abuse, Jackson’s arrest actually resulted from an internal investigation by the Sheriff’s department itself.

On December 31, 2009, Jackson grabbed an inmate at the Compton lockup by his shirt, threw him down to the ground, and repeatedly punched and kicked him in the head. The inmate, named Cesar Campana, sustained severe injuries.

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On December 25th, 2010, Jackson was involved in a brawl that stemmed from an unwarranted search. The search turned violent on all sides, and Jackson punched an inmate’s head hard enough that the inmate passed out. When the time came to file a report, Jackson lied about it incident and said the inmate was trafficking contraband. The inmate had none in reality.

Deputy District Attorney Ann Marie Wise argued that Jackson was prone to using his fists and unreasonable force to subdue inmates.

“Deputy Jackson solves problems in the jail with his fists” and then “filed false reports ... to justify his actions,” Wise said in court, according to the Daily News.

Jurors are still deliberating one felony count involving Campana, with a decision expected Monday.

Convictions against troubled Sheriff's Department employees has been relatively common of late. Most notably, former undersheriff Paul Tanaka was found guilty of wide ranging conspiracy and obstruction of justice charges two weeks ago.