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This Gorgeous Timelapse Captures The Supermoon Setting Over L.A.

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(Photo by Kevin Greene)

The Supermoon just happened, which was nice as it allowed us to look to the sky at a celestial body that Donald Trump can't ruin (probably?). This Supermoon (our third this year) was the largest one since 1948, but if it didn't look that way from where you were standing*, it's probably because the Supermoon is best captured on camera. Kevin Greene took the above photo while shooting this gorgeous timelapse, which shows the Supermoon setting behind Downtown Los Angeles. Behold:

Greene told us, "With all of the supermoon hype, social media was inevitably going to be full of fake moons so I set out to capture the real thing. I used an app called The Photographers Ephemeris to find the perfect location to shoot the supermoonset relatively far from downtown L.A. in order to make the moon look as large as possible relative to the city (something called lens compression). A week prior to the event I found the perfect spot in Whittier, but it was on private land. Signs were posted everywhere warning me to go back, but I spotted a man watering his plants in the backyard. I approached him and asked him if I could shoot the supermoonset from there. At first he said absolutely not, but after explaining my research and by simply being honest about my adventure and my intentions, he gave me exclusive permission." Greene shot this around 5 a.m.

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According to NASA (via Space.com), "The term 'supermoon' is used to describe a full moon at its perigee — the point in the moon's orbit when it is closest to Earth, causing it to appear up to 14 percent bigger and 30 percent brighter in the sky." The full moon will not be this close to Earth again until November 25th, 2034.

* Here's Neil to ruin the magic.