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Maynard James Keenan's Latest Release: Wine

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Maynard Keenan, frontman for Tool, A Perfect Circle and Puscifier, loves the grape – especially the wine it produces. He’s taken his interest a step further by growing, harvesting and making his own wine. He's owner/part owner of a few vineyards in Arizona (Caduceus Cellars/Merkin Vineyards and Arizona Stronghold Vineyard), and this afternoon from 4:30-7:30 pm, he’ll be making an appearance at Whole Foods in Pasadena (465 S. Arroyo Pkway at Bellevue) to sign and showcase the latest releases. (There's another Whole Foods signing in Venice tomorrow afternoon.)

LAist did a quick Q&A with Maynard recently about his wine.

What types of wines are you showcasing at Whole Foods in SoCal?
We're showcasing our first releases from Arizona Stronghold Vineyards (all Arizona fruit): 2007 "Tazi" Sav Blanc, Riesling, Chardonnay, Malvasia Bianca; 2007 "Mangus" Cab Sav, Merlot, Cab Franc; and 2007 "Nachise" Syrah, Grenache, Petit Syrah. We'll also have a 2nd release of the 2006 Merkin Vineyards "Chupacabra," which is a blend of Syrah and Cab Sav from the paso Robles area of California, and the new release from Caduceus, the 2006 "Primer Paso" 94% Paso Robles Syrah, 6% Arizona Malvasia Bianca.

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We read somewhere that you had an immense collection of wines (6,000+) at the time. Do you still collect? And if so how many do you have?
I'd have to take a few days to count, but I usually never make it to the end. I get distracted, open up something, and start Texting Under the Influence (TUI). I don't collect as much as I used to. The majority of the wine I purchase now is for education and research. The more you taste, compare, dissect, the better your frame of reference. Like any other discipline, repetition and exposure develops your skill level. Putting it into Brazilian Jiu Jitsu terms, I'm about a blue belt.

Can you name us some of your favorite deserted island wines? Maybe let's keep it under $20 for our LAist readers.
That's a tough parameter for me. The $20.00 limit. Usually I'm meeting like minded winos and we all bring bottles, or the local restaurant is sharing a glass here or there, so I have no idea how much they cost. But in general I'd have to say Spanish Wines from Ribera Del Duero. Or some Italian Brunellos. Or the old standby, Chateauneuf Du Pape.

If you went to a dinner party and the host opened up a bottle of Two Buck Chuck (any variety) would you drink it?
I would for sure try it, but most likely I would then resort back to the several bottles I most likely have hidden in my trench coat. And as soon as I can figure out a way to conceal Ridel stemware without breaking it, I'll most likely travel with those as well. And cheese.