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Arts and Entertainment

Photos: The First Ever L.A. River Campout

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Marshmallow roasts, singing with park rangers and going on nature walks are things you might not expect people to do on the banks of the L.A. River. But now that the California State Parks owns the 18 acres that includes the Bowtie Parcel in East L.A., they're hoping the land can become a recreational space for everyone to enjoy.

Over 100 people set up tents and sleeping bags this weekend at the first ever (and sold-out!) L.A. River Campout organized by the California State Parks, arts and culture nonprofit Clockshop and Mountain Recreation and Conservation Authority. It was your basic, idyllic American camping trip. There were even babies in attendance.

Recently, a second stretch of the river was opened for kayaking, fishing and walks. Mayor Eric Garcetti has also been lobbying for support from the federal government to rehab 11 miles of the river north of downtown.

Clockshop director Julia Meltzer said, "The goal was to bring a diverse crowd of people down to the Bowtie to experience the L.A. River in all her natural beauty. It was a great way to celebrate the potential $1 billion dollars that could be coming this way."

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