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Documentary Coming To Netflix Says Puff Daddy Ordered The Killing Of 2Pac

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Sean "Puff Daddy" Combs at the 2014 NBA All-Star Game (Photo by Ronald Martinez/Getty Images)
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A new documentary based on the book of a former LAPD detective says Sean "Puffy Daddy" Combs ordered the killing of Tupac Shakur.Murder Rap: Inside the Biggie and Tupac Murders claims that Combs hired a Crips gang member named Duane Keith "Keffe D" Davis to kill both Shakur and his manager, Marion "Suge" Knight. Shakur was shot in a drive-by shooting in Las Vegas on September 7, 1996, and later died from his injuries. Six months later, rapper Christopher "Notorious B.I.G." Wallace—an associate of Combs—was shot and killed in a drive-by shooting in front of the Peterson Auto Museum. Former LAPD detective Greg Kading, who led an investigation in 2006 to clear the LAPD of any involvement in the coverup of Wallace's murder, detailed these allegations in his 2011 book (also titled Murder Rap).

The LAPD was cleared of any wrongdoing, but Kading says he uncovered enough evidence to be certain he cracked the case. "There is no doubt in my mind that we've discovered the truth and we're presenting the truth," he told HuffPost Entertainment when speaking of the documentary, directed by Mike Dorsey. "So as far as the murders go, they're solved."

Kading goes on to say that Christopher "Notorious B.I.G." Wallace was shot and killed by Bloods gang member Wardell "Poochie" Fouse, allegedly hired by Suge Knight. The former detective says he managed to get a confession out of Keffe D about the events that led up to the shooting of Shakur. "If his intention was to just get away with it, so to speak it would have been very easy for him to not include all the details that he did."

The murders of Tupac and Biggie were the most high-profile events of the East Coast-West Coast hip hop rivalry during the mid-90s. In response to the allegations, Combs told L.A. Weekly 2011 that Kading's "story is pure fiction and completely ridiculous." Today, Knight is behind bars and facing trial for murder and attempted murder in an unrelated case.

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Murder Rap was released last year by Content Media and is currently available on iTunes and VOD. It will be available to stream on Netflix later this spring.