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Arts and Entertainment

Dance On Film Festival Opens!

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Photo courtesy Erika Janunger/Dance Camera West


Photo courtesy Erika Janunger/Dance Camera West
For the eighth year in a row, Dance Camera West will host the Dance Media Film Festival in multiple sites throughout the city from June 5-21. Beginning this Friday and Saturday with three programs screening 31 local and international short (and longer) films at REDCAT downtown, the highly acclaimed festival explores the intersection of cinematography and choreography. Chosen by Los Angeles Magazine as “Pick of the Month” (June 2008), DCW again partners with the city’s most prestigious venues in offering a global perspective on a new visual language through an amalgam of experimental shorts, documentaries, features, and symposiums with visiting international artists.

This year’s collection of work includes more US-made entries than ever before (6), as well as films from South Korea and Cuba (Friday June 5), a potpourri of Latin American dance films (projected on screens outdoors on a lawn in Van Nuys), a presentation of the PBS AMERICAN MASTERS Jerome Robbins documentary, Something to Dance About (Hammer Museum), a choreography in media panel discussion (June 19) and the festival culminates in Contemporary Sacred: Indigenous Dance Artists in Contemporary Culture (The AutryJune 21).

All of the events are reasonably priced (free to $25) and offered at both evening and daytime hours. I’ve seen parts of the previous seven seasons and have been looking forward to this one for months! Lots of options and opportunities to see the two art forms mix!. Don’t miss it!

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