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Here's What You Need To Know As LAUSD Schools Reopen Monday

A group of first-graders, some carrying backpacks, all of them masked, stand six feet apart under pandemic social distancing guidelines on an outdoor playground at an elementary school.
First-graders at Brainard Elementary School in Lake View Terrace lined up outside, socially distanced, when L.A. Unified schools first reopened last spring.
(Kyle Stokes
/
LAist)
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Monday marks the start of the fall semester in the Los Angeles Unified School District, as schools throughout the city welcome students back to campus — some of them for the first time since the start of the pandemic.

Unlike last spring, when some students returned to school under a "hybrid" model, L.A. Unified classrooms will look pretty much like they did before the pandemic: no six-foot spacing between student desks, no Zoom classes, no morning or afternoon shifts.

But classrooms will still be regularly disinfected, and students and teachers will still have to wear masks. They’ll also need weekly COVID-19 tests, whether they are vaccinated or not. And by Oct. 15, as the school district announced last week, all staff will have to be fully vaccinated.

All this is happening as the delta variant spreads and cases among children are on the rise, which has prompted some LAUSD parents to choose independent study.

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LAUSD has this FAQ for families as most students return to in-person instruction. And we've compiled our own list of helpful links as the new school year begins, in L.A. Unified and in other local school districts, some of which have already resumed classes:

Happy first day of school, LAUSD families. And kids, keep those masks on.

What questions do you have about K-12 education in Southern California?
Kyle Stokes reports on the public education system — and the societal forces, parental choices and political decisions that determine which students get access to a “good” school (and how we define a “good school”).