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Climate and Environment

40 Olive Trees Are Planted To Help Restore Historic Grove In Barnsdall Park

A group of people pose for a photo with golden shovels pointing outward.
40 Wilsonii olive trees were planted at Barnsdall Park in an effort to restore its historic olive grove and as part of an initiative through the Park Forest Program that adds trees to city parks to cool surface air temperatures, reduce carbon and educate the public on climate change.
(Courtesy of Council District 13)
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In an effort to restore its historic olive grove, the Barnsdall Art Park Foundation planted 40 Wilsonii olive trees at its East Hollywood location on Thursday.

The planting supports the city's efforts to conserve and improve the park's landscape, infrastructure, public programs and exhibits.

The new olive trees were partially funded by the Los Angeles Park Forest Program, an initiative that adds trees to city parks to cool surface air temperatures, reduce carbon and educate the public on climate change.

The park was once home to more than 1,200 olive trees and was used as a commercial orchard back when it was known as Olive Hill in the 1890s. By 1992, the number fell to 90, but rose back to shy of 500 in more recent times.

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The Barnsdall Art Park Foundation created a fundraising campaign last year to restore the historic olive grove as part of its celebration of the 100th anniversary of Frank Lloyd Wright's Hollyhock House, L.A.'s only UNESCO World Heritage Site. Philanthropist and oil heiress Aline Barnsdall donated it to the city in 1927.

Barnsdall Park is also home to the Los Angeles Municipal Art Gallery.

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