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Memorial Day: Driving Tips From The CHP

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The 110 Freeway during a normally busy Friday rush hour commute last month (Frederic J. Brown/AFP via Getty Images)
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This Memorial Day weekend, the roads aren’t nearly as busy as in years past — AAA didn't even issue a travel forecast — but the California Highway Patrol still says to be careful out there.

Officer Amber Wright says even during the pandemic, the holiday weekend can mean more drivers under the influence. She told us:

"We might be seeing less people on the freeways than anticipated, but it definitely is a time that can still be dangerous, no matter if there was a stay-at-home order or not."

Overall, CHP reports a decline in vehicle crashes and DUIs during stay-at-home orders. But with more open roads, there’s been an increase in speeding. State and local law enforcement warn drivers to watch the speedometer. They say with less traffic, it can be harder to tell when you’re driving too fast.

If you are going for a drive, keep in mind that the holiday weekend is considered a "maximum enforcement period" for the CHP. That means through the end of Monday, more officers are on patrol and they're focusing on violations, particularly people who aren't wearing seatbelts.

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The CHP and Nevada Highway Patrol are targeting the highly traveled I-15 corridor between California and Las Vegas.

It’s estimated that an average of 45,000 vehicles enter Nevada on I-15 from Los Angeles on a daily basis, which equates to an average in excess of 16 million vehicles entering every year.

The CHP will include the use of their fix-winged aircraft that measures speed from the air.

During the Memorial Day weekend last year, CHP reported 34 deaths in traffic collisions in the state. Of those, 21 people were traveling in a car and 10 were not wearing seatbelts.

Meanwhile, gas prices continue to rise. The average price of a gallon of self-serve regular gasoline in Los Angeles County rose today for the 10th time in the last 11 days, increasing to $2.922.

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The Orange County average price rose for the 19th consecutive day, increasing to $2.891. In both counties, gas is still $1.08 cheaper than a year ago.

The increasing prices reflect "the fact that more people are driving than a month ago," said Jeffrey Spring, the Automobile Club of Southern California’s corporate communications manager. "As the state continues to gradually open the economy, we can expect to see gas prices continue to rise."

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