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Rave On: Coliseum Overturns Moratorium on Hosting Raves

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Photo of Electric Daisy in 2009 at the Coliseum by LU5H.bunny via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr
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The Commission that runs the Los Angeles Memorial Coliseum has overturned a ban on raves at the venue initiated in June of this year, according to the LA Times. The moratorium on the events was issued following the drug-related death of a teenager who had been at the Electric Daisy Carnival.

Safety at raves, and party-like concert festivals, became a primary concern after over 100 Electric Daisy attendeessuffered illness or injury at the annual summertime event. However, subsequent events held at the Coliseum not subject to the ban because of having been previously scheduled went off without a hitch, and was proof enough to the Commission and Coliseum GM to give the gatherings the green light once more.

Among the critics of yesterday's verdict to end the ban are Rick Caruso, who serves on the joint city, county and state commission for the venue, and Deputy Chief Pat Gannon of the Los Angeles Police Department. Caruso calls the commission's choice "morally wrong," while Gannon "remain[s] deeply concerned about drug use at the events."