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Transgender Woman Fatally Shot While Pounding On Door For Help

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Deshawnda Sanchez (Facebook)
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Police are looking for more clues in the case of a transgender woman shot at the front door of a South Los Angeles home while trying to escape her killer.Deshawnda Sanchez, 21, was killed on 4 a.m. Wednesday on the front porch near South Wilton Place and West 62nd Street, according to KTLA. Surveillance video from a neighbor's security camera shows a car pulling up to the house and then someone running up to the porch. Then the figure runs back to the car and drives away. The resident of the home came outside after hearing the gunfire, but it was too late. Sanchez died at the scene.

Police believe that Sanchez was running away from a robber, who stole something and then shot her. They didn't know what may have been taken from her. They said it's too soon to say whether the killing may also constitute a hate crime. LAPD Detective Christopher Barling told KTLA, "Deshawnda is a transgender female. At this point we cannot say it’s a hate crime but we have not ruled out that as being a possibility."

Her twin Deshanda Bradley told KTLA, "Honestly, I believe it's a hate crime. Honestly, I think it's because they found out he was a dude and they killed him."

Sanchez wasn't from the area (her Facebook page says she was from Compton but living in Las Vegas). Another sibling told KTLA that she wants to know why Sanchez was in the area and who she knew there.

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This is the third transgender woman killed in a robbery this year. In October, Aniya Parker, 47, was killed in an East Hollywood robbery. Zoraida Reyes, 28, was killed in the parking lot of a Dairy Queen in Anaheim in June.

Christopher Argyros, who manages the anti-violence project at the Los Angeles LGBT Center said that transgender people of color face much higher levels of violence than the rest of the population. He told the Los Angeles Times their identity can be a target of violence or can escalate a situation: "It really demonstrates that transgender women’s lives aren’t valued in our communities. That obviously needs to change."