Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

This is an archival story that predates current editorial management.

This archival content was written, edited, and published prior to LAist's acquisition by its current owner, Southern California Public Radio ("SCPR"). Content, such as language choice and subject matter, in archival articles therefore may not align with SCPR's current editorial standards. To learn more about those standards and why we make this distinction, please click here.

News

Teacher Bans Students From Saying 'Bless You' to Sneezers

sneeze.jpg
Photo by mcfarlandmo via Flickr
Before you read more...
Dear reader, we're asking you to help us keep local news available for all. Your financial support keeps our stories free to read, instead of hidden behind paywalls. We believe when reliable local reporting is widely available, the entire community benefits. Thank you for investing in your neighborhood.

Apparently one teacher in Vacaville has never seen the movie "Singles," and therefore doesn't know that all women want is for a man to say "bless you" to them after they sneeze.

Steve Cuckovich is in fact discouraging the practice of blessing someone after they sneeze among his students -- and thereby ruining the dating lives of God-knows-how-many young men -- with the stated goal of preserving class time. The L.A. Times reports:

He said a student would sneeze, prompting several students to say "Bless You." The sneezer would then thank each of the students who said "Bless you."

Cuckovich maintains that the rule has nothing to do with religion, although he does point out that the practice is somewhat outdated, since the blessing was traditionally given because people thought a sneeze expelled demons from the sneezer's body.

Support for LAist comes from

To implement his rule, Cuckovich is docking students' grade points every time they say the offending phrase. The rule has been poignantly called "messed up" by at least one student, and is very predictably causing some parents to compare the rule to banning the pledge of allegiance in classrooms.