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Off-Duty LAPD Officer Found Dead Of Apparent Suicide After Domestic Disturbance Call

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An off-duty LAPD officer was found dead of an apparent suicide in a Thousand Oaks home Tuesday evening after Ventura County deputies were called to the scene of a domestic disturbance call.

Ventura County Sr. Deputy Tim Lohman told the Associated Press that deputies received a call about a domestic disturbance around 1:30 p.m. By the time they arrived on the scene, they found that the female victim had escaped the home but there was a man locked inside.

Deputies spent hours trying to contact the man before they went inside after 6:30 p.m. and found that he was dead of an apparent suicide. LAPD said the officer was from the department's Valley Division and assigned to traffic, but his identity has not been released.

Detectives are still investigating what happened, according to The Daily Breeze. It's being called an apparent suicide because the coroner still hasn't finished an investigation.

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If someone you know exhibits warning signs of suicide: do not leave the person alone, remove any firearms, alcohol, drugs or sharp objects that could be used in a suicide attempt, and call the U.S. National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 800-273-TALK (8255) or take the person to an emergency room or seek help from a medical or mental health professional.