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Non-Cooperation from Porn Industry: Could it Result in Forced Condom Use?

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Photo by Koga/LAist (more photos here)


Photo by Koga/LAist (more photos here)
The porn industry's self regulation, albeit a good step, but never to the satisfaction of health officials, has been for the most part under the radar until cases like the one happening this week. Yesterday morning it was reported that one case of HIV was within the industry. Then in the afternoon, reports surfaced that there has been at least 16 since 2004, when the last reported group of performers tested positive for HIV.

“I don’t think we have the degree of cooperation that we would like in cases like this,” said Dr. Jonathan Fielding, Los Angeles County health officer to the LA Times. “We’d like a little more proactive cooperation.”

AIM is required to notify the county seven days after testing. The most recent positive test came in last Saturday. “Rumor is rampant when the words HIV and porn are in the same sentence; the media is like a moth to a flame,” said Dr. Sharon Mitchell of Adult Industry Medical, the industry's non profit dedicated to regular testing.

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If safety advocates had their way, condoms would be required on porn sets, which many industry folk say would drive viewers away from American films since European porn does not use condoms. However, the recent controversy is not helping the industry's standpoint and advocates like porn star and Nevada prostitute Anita Cannibal contend that the amount of money spent on editing out condoms to make it look like they're not being used is negligible. Still, industry folk believe it would drive business underground where no disease regulation whatsoever happens--at least now, there is AIM.

As for Cannibal, these days she is focusing her efforts in Nevada. "I chose to go work as a legal prostitute than prostitute my morals and values for work!" she told LAist.