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Yogurtland Chief Steps Down

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Photo by ajcreencia via Flickr
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Having vanquished all his competitors, Yogurtland's founder is stepping down as president and CEO.

Phillip Chang, 50, will stay on as the Irvine-based company's chairman, but will focus his life on Christian missionary work, the O.C. Register reports. Yogurtland, which is privately owned, professes to be more profitable than ever.

The Yogurtland stores, with their signature Papyrus-font wall displays extolling the health benefits of soft-serve ice cream, are truly the last-man standing after the take-no-prisoners frozen yogurt wars of the mid-aughts. Yogurtland dashed progenitor Pinkberry's concept of trendy slightly-tart flavors and carefully hand-topped treats in favor of a serve-yourself model that relies on a wide variety of flavors with more saccharine leanings.

Ultimately, Yogurtland's scorched-earth expansion laid waste to the equally rapidly expanding Pinkberry, Red Mango, Céfiore and more; while a handful of stores from those other chains still exist, they hardly dominate the landscape like Yogurtland does.

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The company "continues to experiment with new flavors and concepts at its research and development lab in Irvine," the Register reports.