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Mongols No More

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Law enforcement officers investigate the home of Ruben Cavazos, former national president of the Mongol motorcycle gang (AP Photo/Ric Francis)

Rejected for their ethnicity from the biker gang Hell's Angels in the 1970s, a group of Latinos formed their own called The Mongols, as the story is told according to the LA Times reporting on today's massive raid of the gang.

This morning, over 1,000 officers across Southern California and in five different states arrested around 38 alleged Mongol members under federal racketeering charges. And that's not all, the government seeks to trademark the group's name and branding. "Not only are we going after the Mongols' motorcycles, we're going after their very identity," U.S. Attorney Thomas P. O'Brien told the Times. "We are using all the tools at our disposal to crush this violent gang."

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The gang was infiltrated by four undercover ATF agents who mostly gathered the intel along with four paid informants for today's indictment. Arrested members in the Los Angeles area are expected to appear in court today.