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SoCal Finally Gets A Running Of The Bulls Event

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A bull enters the bullring at the Running Of The Bulls festival on July 13, 2013 in Pamplona, Spain (Photo by Pablo Blazquez Dominguez/Getty Images)
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If you've never had the opportunity to make your way over to Pamplona, Spain to get chased down by bulls at their annual running of the bulls event, now here's your chance. Temecula will be hosting the first The Great Bull Run for the West Coast this summer. (You too can now run in fear in the comforts of your own home state!)

The organizers of the event will be hosting the bull run at the Galway Downs equestrian center on June 21. It's one of the ten locations across the U.S. to hosting the event, including NorCal in July.

However, this one is a bit different than the ones held in Pamplona. Instead of running down narrow cobblestone streets, bold participants here will run alongside the bulls in a dirt or grassy quarter-mile fenced-off track. (Pamplona's track is a half mile.) It has outlets that allows folks to run off the track if they freak out and need an escape route. It's a little more tame, but honestly, we can't imagine the lawsuits that could come out of this one if everyone had the chance to get majorly hurt. (Hello, we live in California!) Also, unlike Spain, you'll have to sign a waiver and pay a mandatory insurance fee in case you get... you know, maimed.

On the event's FAQ section on its website, it talks about how running with the bulls can be dangerous:

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By participating in the run, you accept the risk that you might be trampled, gored, rammed or tossed in the air by a bull, or bumped, jostled, tripped or trampled by your fellow runners. Make no mistake: you could get seriously injured in this event.

Though, the organizers assure that since they only let the bulls run on dirt or grass tracks, instead of city streets, this should prevent slips and falls that would otherwise happen on pavement. It's also a straight path unlike the twists and turns the bulls have to take in Spain at street corners.

The event hasn't gone without any protests from animal rights groups though. The run was originally supposed to take place in Lake Elsinore in March, but in November, Lake Elsinore City Manager Grant Yates squashed the plans because of safety concerns for both people and animals, according to the Press-Enterprise.

Animal rights groups, such as PETA have been fighting these bull runs.

“This is America," Jessica Blome, a Fund staff attorney based in Cotati, Calif. told the Press-Enterprise. "At this point torturing and traumatizing animals for profit should be a settled issue."

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The Great Bull Run’s CEO Rob Dickens assures that the animals are treated well and that one bull hasn't been hurt. Though, that doesn't rule out humans getting hurt.

A 21-year-old college student suffered a concussion and had cuts to his face after The Great Bull Run took place in Houston on Jan. 25. He had to be hospitalized, but he told KSAT that he doesn't "regret it at all."

Oh, and there's also a Tomato Royale food fight you can sign up for that takes place after the stampede. You can get some nice cold brewksies while tossing tomatoes at others.

For more information on how to register, visit The Great Bull Run website.