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832 Miles of New Bikeways Coming to L.A. County, Thanks to Updated Bicycle Master Plan

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Photo by Emmanuel_D.Photography via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr
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The Los Angeles County Bicycle Master Plan has been updated and approved today, and includes plans for 832 miles of new bikeways, as well as over $330 million in funding to be spent over 20 years on improving access to and the safety of bicycle transit in L.A.

The Master Plan, in development since 2009, was released to the public in October 2011.

According to a release issued by Los Angeles County Supervisor Don Knabe today, those funds will be used to improve "the interconnectedness of bike corridors and develop support facilities that encourage cycling, through additional bike lanes, signage, traffic calming measures and safety and educational programs."

There was some concern about that funding, though, and Supervisor Michael Antonovich not only raised fears about sourcing funds, but also abstained from voting. "Monies will come from various Department of Public Works funds, including local return funds raised through Proposition C and Measure R," explains City News Service.

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The plan passed by a 4-0 vote.

More thoughts from Knabe:

“The updated Plan combines the vision of local communities and the County for the development of opportunities to increase cycling as a viable transit option for residents. While Los Angeles is known as a car culture, voters have told us time and again that they want options - be it public transit or bicycles - as a way to alleviate traffic congestion, improve air quality and enhance the health and quality-of-life in our communities.”

Through the Bicycle Master Plan, Los Angeles County will invest over $330 million over 20 years to increase the interconnectedness of bike corridors and develop support facilities that encourage cycling, through additional bike lanes, signage, traffic calming measures and safety and educational programs.