Dear LAist: Can I Take My Bike On Metro Trains?

A man rides his bicycle with a dog in the basket in car-free streets during CicLAvia (CHRIS DELMAS/AFP/Getty Images)

WE'RE ANSWERING THE QUESTIONS ABOUT SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA THAT KEEP YOU UP AT NIGHT. IF YOU HAVE ONE, ASK IT HERE.


Safety improvements for cyclists in Los Angeles have been slow at best. Some bike lanes have been added in heavily trafficked areas, new safety measures have been tested and two-way bike lanes were installed, with other projects in various stages of completion.

But as the city slogs through those changes, some two-wheeled-vehicle enthusiasts are anxious to know just how far they can travel through the city with their bikes, and how those bikes can be transported. To that end, LAist reader Scott sent us a question:,

"Is biking and using the rail a viable combination in L.A.? In D.C., you couldn't use rail with a bike in tow during rush hours."

According to Metro's website, you can bring bicycles on busses and trains at any time of day or night. All busses are equipped with at least two bike racks located near their front bumpers. Trains offer open areas designated for bikes, strollers and other bulky objects, which are marked with a yellow strip and illustrations about what the space is to be used for.

If the designated areas are full, Metro advises riders to wait for the next train (or bus).

But congestion isn't the only possible roadblock; bike parking and theft has also been a concern. In 2018, 80 bicycles were reported stolen from various Metro train stations. Most of those thefts occurred overnight, with the highest numbers at Expo Line stations.

Currently, Metro offers bike racks, bike lockers and indoor bike hubs for storage. According to a recent report, Metro has bike racks at "virtually every" station, and bike lockers at 53 locations.