Bob Baker Marionette Theater Moves To Highland Park

A new rendering of the exterior of the new Bob Baker Marionette Theater, by Carson Brown. (Courtesy Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

The Bob Baker Marionette Theater closed last fall after decades as a beloved Los Angeles landmark — and years of financial struggles. But they've found a new home in Highland Park.

They plan to hold the first events at the new space early this summer, previewing their new season. They're also set to hold community shows and sneak peeks beginning in March. The new theater's grand opening is scheduled for this fall.

A child meets a faux ostrich, thanks to the Bob Baker Marionette Theater. (Courtesy Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

The new venue is 10,000 square feet, which is 3,000 more than the old location, according to the organization, it announced in a press release this morning. They plan to use the added space for both education and exhibition programs.

While the theater's former site is being turned into an apartment complex, the theater said in a press release that it still plans to service its former Westlake community in various ways. As the puppet company has left its old home, they've sought to expand with pop-up performances, a residence at Pasadena Playhouse, and other outreach efforts. They have a residency coming up with Occidental College's Oxy Arts.

A rendering showing nameplates on the chairs at the new Bob Baker Marionette Theater, by Carson Brown. (Courtesy Bob Baker Marionette Theater)

Now a nonprofit, they're currently trying to fundraise to support their work at both the new location and beyond. That includes offering nameplates on chairs in the new theater — for $1,000.

You can visit the new theater when it opens at 4949 York Boulevard. You can also see the theater out in the world this Saturday at the fifth annual Bob Baker Day, taking place at Los Angeles State Historic Park. It's a free family event, including a carnival, live music, puppet-making workshops, food trucks, and more.

For more on the theater's financial struggles, efforts to turn the organization around, becoming a nonprofit, and more, read our October interview with the theater's director of development and community engagement.

This story has been updated.