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News

Two Men Accused Of Kidnapping And Shooting Brother Of Dodgers Pitcher

josh_ravin.jpg
Josh Ravin (Photo by Stephen Dunn/Getty Images)
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Police have arrested two men in connection with the shooting of Joel Ravin, the brother of Dodgers pitcher Josh Ravin. Randall Elmer Stinson, a 30-year-old man from Winnetka, was arrested on Oct. 20 on suspicion of attempted murder, kidnapping and robbery, according to a release from the LAPD. James Bagget, a 28-year-old man from Panorama City, turned himself in to authorities yesterday after a warrant was issued of his arrest.

Joel Ravin was shot five times as he returned to his West Hills home in the 22900 block of Vanowen Street at about 1:45 a.m. on Oct. 4. Initial reports suggested that Ravin was coming home when he was approached by a man and shot five times while still in his car. Now, prosecutors are saying that Ravin was kidnapped, driven to a number of locations and then returned back to his home, where he was shot, NBC Los Angeles reports.

At the time of the incident, Ravin's mother, Lana Ravin, said the attacker was someone they knew. Josh Ravin, who is a pitcher for the L.A. Dodgers, tweeted that the shooter was mentally ill and called for "mental health control" instead of gun control.