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Think California is a Top U.S. Location for Solar Power?

solarpanel-ranking.jpg
Photo by Jimmy_Joe via Flickr
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If you think the Golden State is one of the top states when it comes to being an ideal location for harnessing that sun power, you'd be incorrect, according to The W.P. Carey School Of Business At Arizona State University's Professor Matt Croucher in the HuffPo. California didn't make the top 10, or even the top 20. Try a tie for #30 with Utah.

What makes a state a great spot for solar?

Ideal states should have: a relatively high level of solar insolation (ability to generate a significant amount of solar energy), a fairly large amount of economic activity resulting from solar energy being deployed, a reasonably low cost of energy installation, higher than average current prices for electricity, and the potential for electricity production through solar power that would offset large amounts of carbon emissions.

Based on Croucher's criteria, Hawaii ranks at the top. "With the highest average cost of electricity and relatively high carbon emissions, Hawaii (No. 1) ranks at the top because solar deployment would be so beneficial under those conditions. Being the state closest to the equator and all the sunny days help, too."