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News

Sweet Relief: Rain Is On Its Way

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Photo by *BUTLER (zsumoz) via the LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr
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How'd that heat wave treat you?With the worst of it behind us, forecasters say Southern California might also get a little bit of rain to help cool things down the next three days. A "big blob of moisture leftover from Hurricane Linda is still out there" coming up from southwest of San Diego, the forecasters told City News Service, and it's poised to possibly give us a little precipitation.

Meteorologists are unsure of how it'll interact with a low pressure system in its path, meaning the expected amount of rainfall is uncertain. "There are major uncertainties as to where that big blob of moisture is going to go," said meteorologist Ryan Kittell. However, estimates have it at anywhere between a quarter-of-an-inch and an inch of rain in Los Angeles County, with higher elevations and mountains to get more.

The rain is expected to start falling on Monday afternoon and last through Wednesday at the latest.

While it doesn't sound like a whole lot, the National Weather Service still warns drivers to be careful while driving in the rain. The dry spell has let oil build up on the roadways, and combined with just a little bit of water it can get pretty slick.