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News

Don't Run that Light! 14 Red Light Enforcement Cameras to be Installed along the Eastside Gold Line

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Just like they eventually did with the Orange Line, Metro is beginning to install red light enforcement cameras along the Gold Line. By the end of August, the agency expects to have installation complete at a few intersections along First Street. An opening date for the new light rail line between Union Station and East LA has not been announced.

In total, 14 will be installed along First Street at Mission, Anderson, Utah, Clarence and Lorena streets and on Third Street with crossings at Gage, Downey, Eastern, Ford, McDonnell, Arizona, Mednik, Civic Center Drive and La Verne streets, in Boyle Heights and East Los Angeles. Locations were based on risk and potential for accidents, Metro says.

If you're caught running a red light, the cost will be $445 for an adult and $435 for those 18 and younger. Two photographs will be taken--one before running the red and one after--and a ticket will be mailed to the car's registered owner. Unlike the cameras under the jurisdiction of the LAPD, these cameras run by Metro and the LA County Sheriff's will not include video as proof of violators running a red light. Before tickets are sent out, Sheriff's will have a 30-day grace period when warnings will be mailed.