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Coolhaus: The Kogi of Ice Cream Sandwiches

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Natasha Case, left, and Freya Estreller (inside the truck) are the minds behind Coolhaus ice cream sandwiches.
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Meet Freya Estreller and Natasha Case, the twentysomething women behind the Coolhaus ice cream sandwich brand. You may have already caught them proffering their wares at various events around town -- Barnsdall Park, Venice First Fridays, Stories Books -- in their pink, chrome-rimmed converted postal jeep. But for those who haven't had the Coolhaus experience, we'll break it down for you.

The Coolhaus ice cream sandwich is a homemade and all-natural ice cream (featuring local and organic ingredients when possible) scooped in between two cookies. Currently, there are five basic flavors inspired by architecture and design. There's the Frank Behry (sugar cookie with strawberry ice cream), Mintimalism (chocolate cookie and mint chip ice cream), Mies Vanilla Rohe (chocolate chip cookie and vanilla ice cream), Richard Meyer Lemon Ginger (ginger cookie and lemon ice cream), and Oatmeal Cinnamoneo (oatmeal cookie and cinnamon ice cream).

When Freya and Natasha and their team are out scooping at events, customers can order the sandwiches straight off the menu or mix and match flavors. They also create special flavors for different events like Honeyhock ice cream as an ode to the Hollyhock House, a Neutropolitan and a baked apple sandwich (called the Renzo Apple Piano) that will be sold exclusively at Wurstkuche in the Arts District.

LA's urban sprawl is a perfect market for the mobile food concept. Like the taco truck model, each sandwich off the truck is made to order, and like the Kogi model for meals on wheels, the girls Twitter their location to the growing legions of followers. (It's quite a different experience than chasing the ice cream truck down the street for an overpriced popsicle!)