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Flickr + Picnik = Web Photo Editing Made Easy

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It was a craaaaazy night on the town. You took dozens of photos with your pocket-sized digital camera. But you don't have Photoshop, and all you want to do is upload your pics directly to Flickr (something you could even do wirelessly if Hanukkah Harry hooks you up with with an Eye-Fi).

Good news.

Flick just went live with a new feature that allows you to crop, resize, touch-up, de-red-eye, brighten, and flip your photos without ever leaving your photo's Flickr page. Picnik's API has been open since May and was one of the original Facebook apps upon the launch of the F8 platform. So for Flickr users, this collaboration -- or any in-site editing tool for that matter -- was a long time coming.

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It takes a few seconds to get Picnik running live within Flickr, but once it's going there's quite a bit you can do -- and it's fun! For precision editing, we're still happy to have Photoshop or Paint.net (at the very least). Also, aside from basic fonts and shapes, holiday ornaments, and speech bubbles, the advanced gadgets require a Picnik Premium account, for $24.95/year.

When you're finished live-editing your Flickr photo, pressing "save" doesn't automatically over-write the original -- you can choose to save as a new photo in your photostream. You can also do things like right-click (CTRL-click) and flip or skew any objects and speech bubbles you add to the photo).

Flickr has traditionally been considered a photo-storage and sharing site geared more towards hobbyists and pro-am photographers whereas Photobucket, Snapfish, Shutterfly and others are considered photo-storage sites for the masses. Will the incorporation of Picnik's user-friendly photo editing tool make Flickr more attractive to mainstream photographers and social networking content producers?