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Eerie Video Takes You Inside The Los Feliz Murder House

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(Photos via Realtor.com and LAist)

Before 2475 Glendower Place went on the market after sitting in abandonment for half a century, the home—better known as the Los Feliz Murder House—had a visitor.

Alexis Vaughn "got the opportunity to explore the fabled murder mansion" back in January, and documented the visit, which she has now shared in the below video. This was before it was cleaned up and cleared out, so you'll see it as it sat for all those decades. There are creepy dolls, peeling paint, handwritten notes, stacks of newspapers—this place is straight out of Central Casting!

When the home was put on the market last month, we saw an unmarked moving truck loaded with items, but we failed to trail it, so this stuff may all be at a local thrift store.

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The Spanish Revival Mansion was purchased by the Perelson family in the 1950s, and became the scene of a grisly murder in 1959, when Dr. Harold Perelson took a hammer and struck his sleeping wife in the head, killing her. He then entered the bedroom of his 18-year-old daughter, Judye, and hit her with the hammer, but she managed to escape. The other chidren, ages 11 and 13, were told they were having a nightmare. When a neighbor, Marshall Ross, arrived at the home, Perelson swallowed two Nembutals (a barbiturate) and 31 other pills and died on Judye's bed before paramedics arrived.

It's unclear whose items you are seeing in the video, as Rudy Enriquez was the last owner—according to Curbed, he "inherited the house from his parents, Emily and Julian Enriquez, who bought the house at a probate auction back in 1960. Word was they never moved in, but appeared to use the house for storage."