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Arts and Entertainment

Of Course, Your Child Can Take Mermaid Lessons In Los Angeles

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Los Angeles sure doesn't have a shortage of weird and quirky things to do, but we were were actually a little surprised to find out that children can take mermaid-merman lessons in our city.

After seeing The Little Mermaid a gazillion times, we have to admit that we would've jumped at the chance to be a mermaid when we were kids (but really, as adults, too). L.A. Mermaid School, which is run by entertainment company, Sheroes Entertainment, is offering lessons for mermaid or mermen training on June 27 and July 11 in Venice. While the website says they accept anyone ages 6 and up, owner Virginia Hankins tells LAist that the average age they're targeting are preteens around 8 to 11. However, adults are totally welcome to take a lesson, too, if you're looking for a new experience.

The classes, which run at $40, are taught by the company's professionally-trained folk who have mermaid-mermen roles in the Hollywood biz. Anyone who takes the class is required to already know how to swim. (After we watched some videos of mermaid swimming, we've come to realize that swimming with your legs strapped together is expert-level water work.) The instructors teach guests how to use a monofin, which they can provide, in the 1 hour 15 minute lesson. You'll also learn about what it takes to be a mermaid and some other techniques they use on screen.

This is the first time Sheroes Entertainment is opening their mermaid-mermen lessons to the public. Normally, they only give private training to those who need to learn for work in film. Hankins says that this class "isn't just a novelty," and that they also teach safety techniques. A certified American Red Cross lifeguard will be on site, too.

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