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Arts and Entertainment

It's Not The Size Of The Rainbow, It's How Sony Uses It: Wizard Of Oz Public Art Finds A Home

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Photo by pd88 via LAist Featured Photos pool on Flickr
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Somewhere over the rainbow has been discovered. It's a magical place called Culver City. Dodge the poppies and be mindful of apple-throwing trees as you make your way to Sony Pictures Entertainment where a 94-foot tall sculpture of a rainbow will be installed on the lot, according to the Daily Breeze.

At 94 feet tall and 188 feet wide, the sculpture will span the distance between the studios' Main Street and Madison Avenue entrance on the eastern portion of the lot. Developers of the public artwork, which will be visible from many parts of the city, hope that the rainbow inspires optimism in all who see it.

A collaboration between Sony Pictures' and multimedia artist Tony Tasset, the "Rainbow" project, with a $1.6 million price tag, is a connection to Metro Goldwyn Mayer (MGM) classics shot on the lot and also a fulfillment of Sony Pictures' public art requirement.

Culver City's Municipal Code states that any new construction projects costing more than $500,000 and remodeling projects costing more than $250,000 must allocate 1 percent of the budget for some form of public art. Funding for "Rainbow" comes from the 2009 construction of two new office buildings and a parking structure at the studios.
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"Rainbow" set to be constructed of "steel truss and aluminum panels" was approved by the Culver City Cultural Affairs Commission in May and is slated for installation on the lot next year.