Support for LAist comes from
We Explain L.A.
Stay Connected

Share This

This is an archival story that predates current editorial management.

This archival content was written, edited, and published prior to LAist's acquisition by its current owner, Southern California Public Radio ("SCPR"). Content, such as language choice and subject matter, in archival articles therefore may not align with SCPR's current editorial standards. To learn more about those standards and why we make this distinction, please click here.

News

Andy Warhol Paintings Stolen, $1 Million Reward Announced

Before you read more...
Dear reader, we're asking you to help us keep local news available for all. Your tax-deductible financial support keeps our stories free to read, instead of hidden behind paywalls. We believe when reliable local reporting is widely available, the entire community benefits. Thank you for investing in your neighborhood.

A well known series of portraits by Andy Warhol was stolen sometime last week, the LAPD said today. Sometime between September 2nd and 3rd, the multi-million-dollar Athlete Series was stolen from the home of Richard L. Weisman, who commissioned Warhol for the series and lives on a street off Beverly Glen Boulevard in the hills.

A housekeeper discovered the paintings missing on September 3rd--Weisman had last been at the home the day before. Of the 11 stolen silk-screen 40" x 40" paintings, one was of Weisman himself. "I commissioned him to do this set of athletes because, generally speaking, the worlds of art and sports don't mesh that well," Weisman told the LA Times in a recent interview.

A reward of $1 million is being offered for information leading to the recovery of the artwork. Anyone with information about this crime is urged to call the Los Angeles Police Department’s Art Theft Detail at (213) 485-2524. After-hours and on weekends, calls may be directed to a 24-hour, toll-free number at 1-877-LAPD-24-7 (527-3247). Callers may also text “Crimes” with a cell phone or log on to www.lapdonline.org and click on Web tips. When using a cell phone, all messages should begin with “LAPD.” Tipsters may remain anonymous.