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Officials Predict Worst Fire Season In 100 Years

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A US Forestry fire fighter fights a wall of fire during an out of control wildfire on May 2, 2013 in Camarillo, California. (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)
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With three major fires already this year, this could be the worst season for Southern California wildfires in 100 years, officials warn.

"We're going to have a very volatile fire season. We are in the third year of a drought," L.A. County Fire Chief Darryl Osby said Monday, according to KNX.

Three large brush fires, the Hathaway, Powerhouse and Springs fires, have already caused havoc ahead of the usual "fire season."

"Extremely dry weather, extremely dry fuel moisture so it makes for almost an explosive situation at times," Cpt. Tom Richards of the LACFD said.

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"We usually don't get to a critical state until the fall, but we're projecting we're gonna get to a critical state in July," another fire official said.

Firefighters from across Southern California met for 2013 Fire Season Outlook in Diamond Bar Monday, where they worked on coordinating firefighting efforts and how possible budget restraints might affect that.

Officials advise homeowners near wildland areas to do their part by cutting shrubs and brush near their home and be prepared to evacuate if ordered to do so.

For a complete "Ready, Set, Go! Wildfire Action Plan," visit the L.A. County Fire Department site.

"It's really a year-round process of planning and preparation in Southern California," Los Angeles County fire Inspector Anthony Akins told City News Service.

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Related:
Springs Fire: 28K Acres Burned, 80% Contained (And Rain!)
Photos: The Springs Fire in Ventura County
Brush Fire Consumes Over 200 Acres in Riverside County
Tips for Safe Hiking During Fire Season