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Here's your daily audio briefing (updated weekdays):




THE L.A. REPORT IS BROUGHT TO YOU BY LLOYD PEST CONTROL

Yes, LA: Cannabis Shops Stay Open. They're Considered An Essential Business In These Times

Updated
Published
The scene in September at the Lowell Cafe in West Hollywood. America's first cannabis restaurant. (Frederic J. Brown / AFP/ Getty Images)

In case you were among the many people with the non-existential question: Can I still buy legal weed?

The answer is yes. L.A County's official Twitter account set many minds at ease with this message:

Anxiety likely rose locally tonight with twin orders from state and county officials telling everyone in "non-essential" jobs to stay home. And hence:

Let's all stay safe out there friends. We'll be back tomorrow with more news and tips on how to stay sane through this unprecedented time.


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.

Governor Orders All Californians To Stay Home To Help Contain Spread Of Coronavirus

Updated
Published
File: California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at the California Department of Public Health on Feb. 27, 2020 in Sacramento. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

All residents of California have been ordered to stay home or otherwise remain at their place of residence in order to combat the spread of coronavirus, the governor said today.

Exceptions are in place for those who work to maintain critical infrastructure in 16 key sectors that "are considered so vital to the United States that their incapacitation or destruction would have a debilitating effect on security, economic security, public health or safety, or any combination thereof."

Those sectors include:

  • Chemical
  • Commercial Facilities
  • Communications
  • Critical Manufacturing
  • Dams
  • Defense Industrial Base
  • Emergency Services
  • Energy
  • Financial Services
  • Food and Agriculture
  • Government Facilities
  • Healthcare and Public Health
  • Information Technology
  • Nuclear Reactors, Materials, and Waste
  • Transportation
  • Water and Wastewater Systems

Gov. Gavin Newsom's announcement came on the heels of a similar one made in Los Angeles County just minutes earlier. Newsom said:

"We'll be putting more detailed information out in the next hours and days about the exemptions to the stay at home order." Newsom said.

In an acknowledgment of the anxiety just about everyone has been feeling since the coronavirus response moved into high gear, Newsom said there's "no greater way you can rationalize this moment than to just practice common sense, to be safe, stay indoors — particularly our seniors."

"This is a moment in time. And it's a challenging moment. And it may be many moments in the foreseeable future. But nonetheless, we will process, we will work together through this moment of challenge, and we will work through and we will triumph over fear, anxiety, and this disease."

Earlier in the day, Newsom sent a request for $1 billion in federal assistance, in addition to sending the hospital ship USNS Mercy. In a letter to President Donald Trump, Newsom said the state anticipates that more than half of the population of California, or 25.5 million people, will be infected over an eight-week period.

To bolster the health care system to handle the expected influx of patients, Newsom said the state is acquiring hospital facilities and bringing former health care workers out of retirement to help run them.

Newsom said given that many volunteers for key services like food banks have stayed home out of an understandable concern, about National Guard troops will be deployed on a "purely humanitarian" basis to help fill those ranks and help distribution and food.

He also said the state will work in partnership with social media sites like Nextdoor to develop information kits to help you prepare at home and give tips for checking in on loved ones.


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


icon
DON'T MISS ANY L.A. CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Get our daily newsletter for the latest on COVID-19 and other top local headlines.


Terms of Use and Privacy Policy


Support our free, independent journalism today. Donate now.

Scheduled Surgeries Might Be Delayed Due To Coronavirus

Updated
Published
Protective face masks (Mladen Antonov/AFP via Getty Images)

The federal government is asking hospitals to limit non-urgent medical and dental procedures to ensure that medical equipment and staff are available to treat the coronavirus.

The Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services issued guidance this week saying hospitals should consider delaying elective procedures like knee replacements and even some cancer treatments.

The agency says life-saving surgeries should go forward. But elective surgeries that can be scheduled in advance should be postponed if the patient can wait.

The ultimate decision is up to the provider.

The federal government hopes to conserve the limited supply of personal protective gear like masks and gowns. Some hospitals in California don't have enough of the critical gear to protect health providers from the coronavirus.

The guidelines are also intended to help hospitals decide which surgeries are higher priority as they ramp up for a potential surge of coronavirus patients.


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more. LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.

Here Are The First 13 Rec Centers To Open To Homeless People

Updated
Published
Yosemite Recreation in Eagle Rock is on the list to become a temporary. Adriene Hill / LAist
The first 13 recreation centers which will operate as shelters for people experiencing homelessness during the coronavirus outbreak has been announced by LA's City Department of Recreation and Parks Emergency Management.
They'll open tomorrow, Friday. The exact time is still to be determined. Here they are:
  • Granada Hills Recreation Center, 16730 Chatsworth St., Granada Hills 91344
  • Hollywood Recreation Center, 1122 Cole Ave., Los Angeles 90038
  • Northridge Recreation Center, 18300 Lemarsh St., Northridge 91324
  • Westchester Recreation Center, 7000 W. Manchester Ave., Los Angeles 90045
  • North Hollywood Recreation Center, 11430 Chandler Blvd., North Hollywood 91601
  • Pan Pacific Recreation Center, 7600 Beverly Blvd., Los Angeles 90036
  • Woodland Hills Recreation Center, 5858 Shoup Ave., Woodland Hills 91367
  • Westwood Recreation Center, 1350 S Sepulveda Blvd, Los Angeles 90025
  • Yosemite Recreation Center, 1840 Yosemite Drive, Los Angeles 90041
  • Central Recreation Center, 1357 E. 22nd St., Los Angeles 90011
  • Echo Park Community Center, 303 Patton St., Los Angeles 90026
  • Cheviot Hills Recreation Center, 2551 Motor Ave., Los Angeles 90064
  • 109th Recreation Center, 1464 East 109th St., Los Angeles 90059

Taking A Historic Step, LA County Issues Sweeping 'Stay At Home' Safety Orders. State Follows Suit

Updated
Published

In an unprecedented move aimed at slowing the rate of the spread of COVID-19 here, L.A. County leaders are now asking residents to remain at home and avoid gathering in any enclosed space with more than 10 people. They're also calling on any non-critical businesses that can't operate remotely to shut down until further notice.

The move came shortly before Gov. Gavin Newsom put similar orders in place for the entire state.

Ealrlier in the day, Los Angeles County officials announced the second COVID-19 death locally and cautioned that the number of confirmed cases so far was not representative of how many cases are here since testing remains limited.

The order is being called the "Safer at Home, Stay at Home" order [which you can also read below.] It bars any public or private gatherings of any size "that would occur outside of a single home," with some exceptions.

"I want to be clear about this," said Mayor Eric Garcetti, "that the only time you should leave your home is for essential activities and needs — to get food, care for a relative or a friend or child, get necessary health care," and the like.

The order goes into effect for most at midnight tonight, Garcetti said.

Any non-critical businesses that require employees to be there in person are being ordered to stop operating after 11:59 p.m. tomorrow (Friday). That includes museums, malls, retail stores, for-profit companies and nonprofit organizations.

Who's exempt? Those whose jobs are critical to safety, health and security of city, as well as an "economy of recovery," Garcetti said. He cited:

  • emergency personnel
  • first responders
  • govt employees
  • medical personnel
  • vital infrastructure workers (including plumbers, electricians and the like)
  • health care providers
  • transportation services
  • grocery stores
  • restaurants (but for take-out or delivery only)
  • news outlets
  • hardware stores
  • gas stations
  • banks and financial institutions
  • plumbers, electricians,
  • dry cleaners and laundromats

But social distancing must be enforced in all of these cases.

Supervisor Kathryn Barger made the initial announcement, saying the order does not mean you cannot go outside at all. Barger said she expected people to still be able to "take a walk, learn a new skill, read a book, videoconference with loved ones, or enjoy open spaces."

"We know that staying home and limiting close contact is the best way to prevent community spread. We know that social distancing does not mean restriction from going outside, and does not mean isolation. We still encourage you to stay connected to your community, and loved ones in creative ways, and to spend much needed time outdoors, people working in essential functions within the healthcare, government, and food industries will still be on the job, but we encourage other employees to stay home."

Garcetti stressed that no one is going to be forcibly kept at home, saying a free society is the "bedrock of who we are."

"But with freedom comes responsibility. And we're asking everybody who, by and large, and overwhelmingly has exercised these directives responsibly to adhere to them. Young and healthy, you're not exempt. You're safer at home."

A cadre of local leaders and public health officials have assembled tonight to detail the new public health order. That includes Los Angeles Mayor Eric Garcetti, Department of Public Health Director Dr. Barbara Ferrer, Long Beach Mayor Robert Garcia, and Pasadena Mayor Terry Tornek. Watch live above.

GOT QUESTIONS?

READ THE FULL ORDER:

LAUSD Will Pay Its Substitute Teachers During Shutdown

Updated
Published
Teacher Jacqueline Porter-Morris shows second-grade students how to take a picture on an iPad in 2018. (Maya Sugarman/KPCC)

Los Angeles Unified school officials have agreed to continue paying the district’s nearly 3,800 substitute teachers for as long as campuses are closed to combat the coronavirus outbreak.

The district’s directive, handed down Wednesday afternoon, will pay substitutes a daily wage during the closure. The amount they’re paid will be based on a sliding scale depending on how much of the current year they’ve worked.

United Teachers Los Angeles — the labor union that also represents substitute teachers — had pushed for a “guaranteed income” for these workers.

“This is good work by the district,” UTLA president Alex Caputo-Pearl said in a video message, “and this is a model that other employers should follow.”

The union for LAUSD’s classified employees, SEIU Local 99, is still negotiating with district officials about their substitutes’ needs during the shutdown, according to union spokeswoman Blanca Gallegos. She said the union represents 100 substitute workers.

GO DEEPER:


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.

Marriages Postponed As County Clerks Offices Close

Updated
Published
Weddings are being postponed in the time of coronavirus (Beatriz Pérez Moya on Unsplash)

Need a marriage license? You’re out of luck in the California counties that have closed their county clerk offices to the public.

In Los Angeles County, you can apply online for a license, but you have to show up in person with your spouse and government ID to receive the license.

Plenty of disappointed couples have had to accept the new reality and postpone their long-planned weddings.

But the downturn in weddings is also having an effect on the wedding industry itself. Wedding planners are paid per-wedding, so no wedding, no cash flow.

Michelle Garibay, a wedding planner in Murrieta, was concerned about the impact. "Some of my colleagues may not make it out the other side of this if too many of their weddings decide to cancel,” she said.

Read more about postponed marriages in Love In The Time Of Coronavirus

LA City Officials And A Bag Full Of Cash — New Corruption Allegations

Updated
Published
Los Angeles City Hall is seen in this photo taken Nov. 30, 2011 (Photo by Kevork Djansezian/Getty Images)

We just learned that a Mar Vista fundraiser pled guilty on a charge connected to his coordination of a $500,000 bribe to a city councilmember, the Department of Justice announced Thursday.

It’s the latest domino to fall in an FBI investigation into corruption at Los Angeles City Hall.

So who was the bag man?

According to the DOJ, it was real estate appraiser Justin Jangwoo Kim. He pled guilty to one count of federal program bribery and agreed to cooperate with an ongoing investigation.

The guilty plea, signed by Kim on March 16, comes only 10 days after an indictment against former councilmember Mitch Englander, who surrendered to authorities on charges he "obstructed an investigation.”

READ THE FULL REPORT

Timeline: Follow The FBI's Sweeping LA City Hall Corruption Investigation Through The Years

Gov. Newsom Requests $1 Billion In Coronavirus Aid, Projects 56% Of Californians Will Contract The Disease

Updated
Published
File: California Gov. Gavin Newsom speaks during a news conference at the California Department of Public Health on Feb. 27, 2020 in Sacramento. (Justin Sullivan/Getty Images)

Gov. Gavin Newsom announced that he has requested federal aid for California to respond to the coronavirus, including $1 billion in federal funding and a request to immediately send the hospital ship USNS Mercy to Los Angeles.

The sweeping orders came less than an hour after L.A. County officials announced similar historic measures, effective at midnight tonight.

In a letter sent today to President Donald Trump, Newsom requested that the ship be stationed here through Sept. 1. The goal: to add additional capacity to the health care system in the Los Angeles region.

He also noted that the state projects that 56 percent of California's population — 25.5 million people — will be infected with COVID-19 over an eight-week period.

In a separate letter sent Thursday to Congressional leaders, Newsom made a number of requests, including an estimate that more than $1 billion in initial federal funding will be needed. The funding will help to purchase personal protective equipment, ventilators, tents for additional medical capacity, cots, and other sheltering supplies, according to the letter.

The federal funding will also be used to create additional health care facilities once existing capacity is exhausted, including activating state-run hospitals and deploying mobile hospitals, according to his letter to Congress. His request includes funding for counties, hospitals, and health systems, as well as for testing and treatment of the uninsured.

The governor also requested help with economic relief for individuals and businesses, as well as help for schools and universities.

Read Newsom's letter to Congress below:

You can also read Newsom's letter to President Trump here.

An earlier version of this post incorrectly gave the date of the letter as Wednesday.

For Cooped Up Seniors: How To Stay Sane

Updated
Published

Life for about six million Californians age 65 and up is harder now that Governor Gavin Newsom announced senior citizens need to stay home to protect themselves from the novel coronavirus.

Public health experts are concerned about the toll it could take on seniors’ mental health

We've put together a resource guide to help seniors cope during this critical time, including tips on how to stay connected, volunteer, exercise and more. Check it out:

A Guide For Seniors On Coping In The Age Of Coronavirus

SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19


We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.


LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.

2nd Coronavirus Death In LA County Announced; Returning To Normal Life In A Couple Weeks Unlikely

Updated
Published

A second person in L.A. County has died from coronavirus, county health director Dr. Barbara Ferrer announced at a Thursday press conference, which you can watch above. The person was "relatively young," lived in the Pasadena area, and suffered from an underlying health condition, she said.

"There are many, many young people — particularly between the ages of 18 and 40 — who are infected themselves ... and who, as we've just unfortunately had to report, can die," Ferrer said. "This is not the time to have a party at your house. This is not the time to go hang out with a whole crowd of people at the beach. This is not the time to be crowding up on our trails in our beautiful parks. This is absolutely the time for everyone to practice social distancing."

The public health department is planning for worst-case scenarios, with the virus potentially lasting for weeks or months, Ferrer said. But, she added, they will also be ready to shift in other scenarios.

"There's absolutely no example I can point to anywhere in the world that would let me believe that we're going to do this for seven days, or 10 days, or even two weeks, and then life is going to return to the normalcy that we all had a few weeks ago," Ferrer said. "That's just not possible, and it's really not likely."

But whether the amount of suppression being done currently can be reduced over time depends on how well people do with it at this time, she added.

THE STATE OF TESTING

As of Wednesday, almost 1,700 people have been tested for coronavirus, Ferrer said. About 13 percent of people who have been tested for coronavirus locally test positive.

The county is working to increase its drive-through testing capabilities, Ferrer said, with more details to be announced as soon as Friday.

Despite calls for wider testing, Ferrer said it was important to continue to check with your doctor first to see if it's appropriate for you to be tested. People without respiratory illness or other symptoms likely will not be tested, she said.

L.A. County Hospitals are working on surging the number of available hospital beds in response to coronavirus, county health services director Dr. Christina Ghaly said.

Ferrer stressed the importance of a mandatory self-quarantine for 14 days if you have been in contact with someone who has tested positive for coronavirus, but noted that you may still not be tested unless you have symptoms.

Ferrer noted the additional difficulties in dealing with coronavirus faced by the homeless population, such as problems observing social distancing and being able to regularly wash your hands.

There have yet to be positive cases identified in the county's jails, Ferrer said, but added that it is highly likely there will be.


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more. LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


icon
DON'T MISS ANY L.A. CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Get our daily newsletter for the latest on COVID-19 and other top local headlines.


Terms of Use and Privacy Policy


Support our free, independent journalism today. Donate now.

On Day 2 Of 'Grab-And-Go,' LAUSD Distributes More Than 90,000 Meals

Updated
Published
Parents picked up meals for their kids at a grab-and-go center run by the LA Unified School District. (Chava Sanchez/LAist)

The Los Angeles Unified School District — like many others around Southern California — has closed all of its campuses in response to the coronavirus outbreak.

Recognizing that many students rely on schools for meals, the district opened 60 "grab-and-go" food centers on Wednesday, where volunteers and staff are handing out free breakfasts and lunches to kids from 7 a.m. to 10 a.m.

On the first day of the program, LAUSD staff and volunteers handed out 40,247 meals, the district says. On Thursday, according to a tweet from schools Supt. Austin Beutner, that number more than doubled, to 92,493 people served meals distributed. [Beutner corrected this on Friday to say more than 183,000 meals had been handed out.

According to a district spokesperson, the 60 grab-and-go meal centers are staffed by more than 1,200 volunteers and district staff from the Red Cross, Beyond the Bell, LA's Best, food services, and other parts of the district.

HERE TO HELP:

Big Bear, Mammoth and Other Mountain Towns Tell Visitors: Keep Out

Updated
Published
A snowboarder at Snow Summit in Big Bear Lake, Calif., Friday, Jan. 8, 2016 (Photo by Christopher Weber/AP)

Tourism-dependent small towns in California are doing the unthinkable: asking visitors to stay away.

Big Bear, Mammoth, Truckee and South Lake Tahoe are among the mountain communities asking anyone who is not a resident to keep out of town.

Eddie Kirsh, the director of marketing and communications for Visit Big Bear, said a group of local health, government and business officials made the decision Thursday morning after speaking with officials in Mammoth, who made their announcement Wednesday.

Kirsh said the group's biggest concern was over-burdening its small, local hospital.

"Any way we can help prevent a health crisis is more beneficial for our residents and potential visitors than trying to get as much business as we can in the short term," he said.


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


These Charts Break Down COVID-19 In California

Updated
Published
A Caltrans freeway sign reads: "Wash your hands, Stay healthy, Avoid COVID-19" in the San Fernando Valley. (John Antczak/AP)

It’s not easy to keep perspective in a pandemic. To help provide context, we’ve rounded up data on the coronavirus in California.


UPDATE: The latest COVID-19 cases in L.A County >>


The chart below shows confirmed cases of the virus in states with more than 4.5 million residents. You can see the early cases in Washington state, the sharp rise of cases in New York, and California’s more gradual — but still extremely, extremely concerning — growth in cases in recent days.

Keep in mind that these numbers, which come from the COVID Tracking Project, reflect confirmed cases, and that the shortage of tests means these numbers are certainly lower than the actual number of cases.

Federal officials have advised that the number of cases could grow dramatically in coming days.

The California Department of Public Health has also been publishing data breaking down the age groups of those infected. It shows that the majority of people infected in the state are adults between 18 and 64. Californians over 65 have been directed to home isolate by Gov. Gavin Newsom.

The state’s department of health has also broken down how cases have been acquired. These numbers do not include the passengers from the Grand Princess cruise ship that docked in Oakland, or positive tests from federal repatriation flights.

GO DEEPER:

SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more. LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


icon
DON'T MISS ANY L.A. CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Get our daily newsletter for the latest on COVID-19 and other top local headlines.


Terms of Use and Privacy Policy


Support our free, independent journalism today. Donate now.

UCLA Announces Virtual Graduation, Students Express Outrage

Updated
Published
The University of California Los Angeles celebrates its centennial in 2019. Andrew Cullen for LAist

UCLA announced Wednesday that its graduation ceremonies will be virtual, in an effort to contain coronavirus.

In a tweet, the university wrote that “the day does not define the journey”...

...and some students did not care for that framing one bit.

The university has not responded as of yet.

MORE ON CORONAVIRUS:
Your No-Panic Guide To Coronavirus In LA So Far
Your No-Panic Guide: Sanitizer, Toilet Paper, Medicine — When Will Everything Be Back In Stock?
Here's Your Quick, To The Point, Coronavirus Prep List
Have A Question? We Will Answer It


SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


icon
DON'T MISS ANY L.A. CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Get our daily newsletter for the latest on COVID-19 and other top local headlines.


Terms of Use and Privacy Policy


Support our free, independent journalism today. Donate now.

FDA Ramping Up Experimental Drugs In Efforts To Treat Coronavirus

Updated
Published

President Donald Trump and the White House Coronavirus Task Force held a press briefing this morning with some updates on the federal response to the COVID-19 pandemic.

Here are some of the key announcements that were made:

  • Dr. Stephen Hahn, FDA commissioner, said his agency is taking steps to make experimental drugs more accessible and fast-track anti-viral treatments for health care providers and patients.
  • Hahn also said the FDA is looking into "convalescent plasma" as a possible treatment — he emphasized that it is not a proven treatment. Hahn described that as taking blood from someone who was infected by coronavirus but recovered. Antibodies in that virus-free blood could "potentially provide a benefit to patients," he said.
  • FEMA will "take the lead in our national coronavirus response," Vice President Mike Pence said. The response will be managed by states, and "federally supported on testing," he added.
  • "State and private labs are now required by law to report all coronavirus testing directly to the CDC," Pence said.
  • New cases are rising as the testing backlog shrinks, Dr. Deborah Birx said. "Test-positive rates are now in the 10-to-11-percent range," she added.
  • President Trump said the government would be helping small businesses through the economic crisis, along with the airline, cruise ship and "probably" the hotel industries.
  • Dr. Birx reiterated that all Americans should follow federal guidelines and take the threat of spreading the infection seriously. "Even 10 or 15 percent of the population [deciding] that what they're doing today is more important than the health and welfare of the rest of the Americans, they can spread the virus in a very strong way," she said.

You can watch the full press conference below (it starts at 01:01:45).

MORE ON CORONAVIRUS:
Your No-Panic Guide To Coronavirus In LA So Far
Your No-Panic Guide: Sanitizer, Toilet Paper, Medicine — When Will Everything Be Back In Stock?
Here's Your Quick, To The Point, Coronavirus Prep List
Have A Question? We Will Answer It

Map: Confirmed U.S. COVID-19 Cases Surpass South Korea and France

Updated
Published

Note: You can see Saturday, March 21's post on the latest numbers here.

This map shows cumulative confirmed cases, deaths and recoveries and is updated in near real-time throughout the day. Zoom out to see more of the world.

As of late tonight here are the total confirmed cases for the 10 countries currently facing the worst outbreaks:

  1. 81,199 China
  2. 41,035 Italy
  3. 18,407 Iran
  4. 18,077 Spain
  5. 15,320 Germany
  6. 14,250 United States
  7. 11,010 France
  8. 8,652 South Korea
  9. 4,164 Switzerland
  10. 2,716 United Kingdom

These numbers are changing rapidly and experts have warned that confirmed cases are far under the actual total of infected individuals. For more detail check the full tracker, which includes death tolls and projections of cases on the Johns Hopkins Center for Systems Science and Engineering site. Engineers there are collecting data from:

Our friends on the L.A. Times datadesk are tracking cases in California by surveying "numbers released by the dozens of local health agencies across the state." As of this this evening, the newspaper is reporting California has:

  • 1,039 confirmed cases
  • 19 deaths

Note: If you hit a paywall on the full tracker an embed on the L.A. Times homepage provides topline numbers.

Remember, the goal of social distancing is to "flatten the curve" of COVID-19's spread.

Source: CDC, Drew Harris (Connie Hanzhang Jin/NPR)

The more we can slow the rate of infection, the less overwhelmed the hospital system will be.

Here's a look at nine scenarios over six, nine and 12 months from our friends at ProPublica:

(Courtesy of ProPublica)

And here's the impact on California hospitals:

(Courtesy of ProPublica)

SOME STRAIGHT TALK ABOUT COVID-19

We're all living through this extraordinary and frightening pandemic. The vast majority of our newsroom has been working from home (here's some advice on that) since March 11 to bring you calm, helpful reporting. We are answering your questions and taking more.

LAist is known for our events listings but now hopefully we'll be known for our non-event listings and tips for parents to try to keep you sane. And we're looking for your nominations for everyday heroes in this time of crisis. We're here to help. And if you can help support that effort financially, we'd be grateful.


icon
DON'T MISS ANY L.A. CORONAVIRUS NEWS

Get our daily newsletter for the latest on COVID-19 and other top local headlines.


Terms of Use and Privacy Policy


Support our free, independent journalism today. Donate now.

Morning Briefing: Housing the Homeless, Seniors-Only Shopping And The Truth About Advil

Updated
Published
(Chava Sanchez / LAist)

As much of the city settles into a new, indoors, Netflix-binging reality, some of us may still feel confused, concerned or downright scared. With that said, our newsroom would like to bring you this good news: A lot of people are doing a lot of nice things for each other out there.

For instance: The city is implementing a plan to bring 7,000 unhoused Angelenos indoors. Grocery stores are opening early for an hour of seniors-only shopping. L.A. County Library is offering digital library cards to folks who don’t already have them. And the list of organizations and individuals helping out those in need is very long, and growing.

It’s looking like we might be in this situation for longer than originally anticipated, but we’ll make it through. In the meantime, here’s what else we’re following...

First a quick break from COVID-19 news (because we need one, too):

And now, your moment of Zen

In Beverly Hills, where even the famous shops on Rodeo Drive have shuttered, a sign at a theatre closed to customers has a sentiment, we hope we can all embrace. Remember the goal: stem the spread of the virus.

Mario Tama/Getty Images) (Mario Tama/)

And now your daily coronavirus briefing. Look for these stories later today:

  • Adolfo Guzman-Lopez looks into a “call to action” sent by a UC student association to administrators regarding the new coronavirus.
  • Long-planned weddings are being cancelled, and not because of cold feet. Sharon McNary explores the option of just getting a marriage certificate from a municipality.
  • Family visitation has been suspended at SoCal jails. Emily Elena Dugdale talks to a relative of an inmate.
  • Commercial tenants will not be evicted if they cannot pay their rent this month, reports Emily Guerin.
  • Governor Gavin Newsom has mentioned help for nursing homes in confronting coronavirus. Jackie Fortiér asks, what is that help, exactly?

In Case You Missed It:

Nominate a hometown hero:

Do you know of someone who is dropping off supplies to seniors, single parents, or others in need? We are starting a series on the radio at 89.3 KPCC and here on LAist highlighting the everyday hero who is helping others during this time. Click here to nominate a hero >>

Help Us Cover Your Community:

  • Got something you’ve always wanted to know about Southern California and the people who call it home? Is there an issue you want us to cover? Ask us anything >>
  • Have a tip about news on which we should dig deeper? Let us know >>

The news cycle moves fast. Some stories don't pan out. Others get added. Consider this today's first draft.


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