All Of Next Season's TV Shows Set In Los Angeles

Stephen Dorff as an L.A. County deputy in... Deputy. (Courtesy Fox)

New York often gets more TV love, playing home to cop show after cop show after cop show (plus other stuff). But four new TV shows announced this week take place here in the L.A. area, and if we're lucky, maybe some of them will shoot here too.

These are shows for next season that are confirmed to take place here — others may, but aren't officially announced as L.A.-set shows at this time.

DEPUTY

Perhaps the most obviously Los Angeles of all of them is Deputy, a new Fox show about the L.A. County Sheriff's Department. The show has an Old West vibe, with the kind of main character who doesn't believe in the rules. It's also filmed in Atlanta (though that new Georgia abortion law could affect that in the future).

The show kicks off with the current sheriff dying of a heart attack and Deputy Bill Hollister (played by Stephen Dorff) being called on to serve as acting sheriff. He grates against the politics of the office — he wants to be in action, while others in the department question his approach.

The show's creative team includes Will Beall as a writer/executive producer and David Ayer as executive producer and the pilot's director. Beall's got plenty of cop show background — he worked on Castle and the TV version of Training Day, along with the movie Gangster Squad. (He also was one of the writers on Aquaman, who we guess is kind of a cop of the sea?) Ayer wrote and directed movies like End of Watch, and the let's-not-talk-about-it Suicide Squad, and the movie that combined those feels with its fantasy-world cops in Bright.

There's also talk of a deputy-involved shooting, getting at one of the most controversial issues in modern law enforcement. (For more on why that is, you can check out our podcast Repeat.) The show was also reportedly produced with the "full cooperation" of the Sheriff's Department, according to Fox, but there was no formal partnership in place. The production team also reached out to cast real cops (in Atlanta). The show premieres midseason.

ALL RISE

CBS apparently loves L.A., picking up three new shows set here. All Rise is a legal drama from the perspective of judges, prosecutors, and public defenders. It's got a light tone to it — it's not quite Ally McBeal, but the trailer includes a new judge tripping as she makes an entrance on her first day, and a client showing up to court in their underwear.

That's not to say it's all comedy — one of the cases in the trailer also focuses on an allegedly bad cop. Simone Missick stars as Judge Lola Carmichael, playing a deputy D.A. turned judge with a clear moral view, trying as these characters so often do to make a difference.

The show's creative team includes one local L.A. icon as a consulting producer — Gil Garcetti, our mayor's dad and the L.A. County D.A. from 1992 until 2000. It's not his first go-round, as he was also a consulting producer on TNT's The Closer and its spin-off Major Crimes, as well as ABC's The D.A.. The show, filmed in L.A., premieres this fall, Mondays at 9 p.m.

BROKE

Broke stars an old CBS favorite, NCIS's Pauley Perrette, taking the comedic chops that made NCIS less heavy into a straight comedy. It's even reusing a word from an old hit CBS TV show title (hi, 2 Broke Girls!).

It's a traditional multicam about a charming guy living off his trust fund (played by Jaime Camil of Jane The Virgin, aka Rogelio) who's cut off by his father and is forced to move in with his wife's estranged sister, played by Perrette. They all live in the tight quarters of a Reseda condo, and the sisters are forced to reconnect.

Comedian/actress Natasha Leggero plays that other sister. She made her name doing comedy with an elevated, high-class character, and it makes her the perfect fit for the formerly wealthy woman-who-has-to-live-with-her-sister. The show is set to debut midseason.

TOMMY

Another midseason debut, Tommy stars Emmy-winning actress Edie Falco (The Sopranos, Nurse Jackie) as L.A.'s first female chief of police. She plays former high-ranking NYPD officer Abigail "Tommy" Thomas who's also a hardass, moving into a new high-profile position while feeling an obligation to represent women well.

She's put in the position after a judge orders the mayor to hire a qualified woman for the position — which he notes in the trailer only includes three candidates. She comes into a lot of conflict with L.A.'s mayor, refusing to play along politically. It's being filmed in L.A.

This story has been updated.