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Looking To Blow Off Steam This Fourth Of July Weekend? Maybe Don’t Blow Stuff Up

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File: Fireworks explode over the Rose Bowl during the 4th of July Taste of America, July 4, 2003. (Photo by Steve Grayson/WireImage) Steve Grayson/WireImage
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For a lot of us, Fourth of July weekend means grilling, hanging out with friends — and, of course, fireworks. But this year, at least in Southern California, one might reconsider blowing stuff up in the name of freedom.

Don’t get us wrong, we want to see things go boom too. Especially after nearly four months of Groundhog Day-style lockdowns. So we’re not going to tell you not to light those Crackling Balls, Widowmakers, and Fat Cats.

That’s Los Angeles City Fire Captain Eric Scott’s job. Here’s what he said when we checked in with him this morning:

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“We understand that the Fourth Of July is a time to celebrate with family and friends, and fireworks historically are a big part of the fun. And we get that. But we see the other side, and that’s the fires that increase, that fireworks will go off into trees, or spread into the nearby grass, or get into the brush and hillsides.”

From a weather standpoint, it’s not a good time for sparks to fly. Besides low humidity and temperatures in the 90s this weekend, there’ll be wind gusts in some places up to 30 miles per hour — the key ingredient for fast fire spread. That adds up to Elevated Fire Weather, per the National Weather Service.

We’ve already seen sizable fires pop up and tear through dry grass and brush over the past few weeks in places like Agua Dulce near Santa Clarita. Not to mention the devastating brushfire in Niland, which destroyed 40 homes and resulted in one death. So, maybe listen to the fire captain, OK?

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